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American Roads and Global Highways

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Fall 2016

 

After Matthew

Kathleen Walls

Here's an emergency post about the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew in Clay and St. Johns counties. Florida.

Read about Matthew in Florida

Adirondack Trail Mix

All in the Family:
A Summer Outing at Bennett's Riding Stable
By Persis Granger

The annual week-long visit from our youngest grandsons, ages 11 and 8, is always an occasion for us to plan an Adirondack itinerary that is both kid-friendly and septuagenarian-doable. Our week 's adventures usually combine outings that have been popular with the boys before, plus some new destinations. It starts something like this: Hey, guys, you know that neat rock shop we went to last summer? Do you want to go there again? We turn on our  "enthusiometers"' to determine the level of genuine interest they have in revisiting that attraction or activity. And then we plan a couple of treks to sites we have not taken them to before, often places we ourselves have never visited, either, which makes it an exciting discovery time for all of us.

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Agri Lanes

Perini Ranch Steakhouse and More

by Kathleen Walls

Many of you may have heard of Perini Ranch Steakhouse in tiny Buffalo Gap, Texas. It is well recognized even outside its native Texas, for its many awards like Best Burger on the Today Show, 3rd Best Steakhouse in Texas by Texas Monthly, and numerous other prestigious awards. It is one of only five restaurants nationwide to be awarded the James Beard Foundation 2014 America’s Classics Award.

 

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Ancient Traces

Jerash: Jordan’s Other Treasure

by Kathleen Walls

Can you imagine stepping back to a civilization that flourished back in 331BC? The ancient ruins of Jerash in Jordan were founded about that date by Alexander the Great or one of his generals. When I visited, I could feel the currents of civilization that had flourished in these ancient streets and buildings.

 

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Art Trails

Art Towns and Rising Stars

by Anne Jenkins

Berea, Ky won the number one spot in the recent 'Top 10 towns for craft lovers' in the USA run by American Craft Week (ACW) beating out stiff competition from the likes of Asheville, N.C. and Burlington, Vt. It is a well deserved win and they are justifiably proud.

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Chuckwagon Roundup

Bountiful Breakfast Bonanza

by Kathleen Walls

Last year Zagat named Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania the No. 1 food city in America. Maybe that is why three of the restaurants featured here are in Pittsburgh. Then way farther south, Tallahassee, Florida has its share. As the state capital, it has to serve good food to keep politicos and visitors alike happy. Manocos Colorado may be a small town but it can hold its own when it comes to great breakfasts. Of course, California is known for food innovations so it’s no surprise Palo Alto, California has a great breakfast spot. Naturally there are many others I have not yet visited. When I do they will be another grouping of Beautiful Breakfast Bonanzas.

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Civil Rights Trails

Fort Concho and the Buffalo Soldiers

by Kathleen Walls

After the Civil War ended newly free African American men began searching for a place they could earn a living with dignity and respect, two attributes that were in short supply for African Americans in September 21, 1866 when the first all black regiments of the peacetime army were formed at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. They were the 10th Cavalry, 9th Cavalry 24th Infantry, and 25th Infantry regiments. Their main purpose was to protect America’s frontier from Indians.

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Elite Street Eats

La Costanera: A Sunset Dream

By Kathleen Walls

La Costanera, perches above Montara Beach with a spectacular view of the Pacific Ocean. It’s a modern Peruvian fusion restaurant and since its opening on October 2, 2009. La Costanera has rapidly made a name for itself. We met with Eric Canupp, Director of Marketing and events. He told us how La Costanera was born.

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Fork in The Road

Miss Hattie's Restaurant and Cathouse Lounge

By Kathleen Walls

Dining at Miss Hattie’s Restaurant and Cathouse Lounge in San Angelo Texas is so enjoyable it should be illegal. But since there is no such thing as too much fun it’s perfectly legal. You can munch on appetizers like Bacon Wrapped Jalapenos, which are filled with cream cheese and offer just enough bite in the crisply fried bite-sized morsels to be delicious without scorching your tonsils. Or you can sample a mixed appetizer plate with three different choices from their special Texas Toothpicks, slivers of breaded onion and jalapenos; Fried Zucchini; Hand dipped Onion Rings; or   Fried Mushrooms all served with a ranch dressing.

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Guest Column

See the Missouri Areas that Inspired Great Authors
By Kathy Barnett

You don’t have to live in New York to write a best-selling novel. You don’t have to live in Hollywood to have that book turned into a hit movie or television series either. So what is the secret? What is the common denominator? The link is to live the life of a Missourian. When in Missouri, visit the roads to the homes of four famous authors that are open to the public so you can relive their stories. Stand in the same spots where they stood and touch mementos that were woven into the storylines of their tales.  

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Happy Trails

Georgia's Little Grand Canyon, Jimmy Carter and a Boll Weevil

By Tom Straka
Photographs by Pat Straka

Most people don’t know Georgia has a Grand Canyon, albeit a little one. It is a couple of hours southwest of Atlanta, near Lumpkin, and called Providence Canyon State Park. The real Grand Canyon took millions of years to form and is a mile deep; Georgia’s took only a few decades to form and is 150 feet deep. However, just like the real Grand Canyon, Georgia’s is spectacular. And, 150 feet is still deep.

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Historical Trails

The Real Wild West at Buffalo Gap Village

By Kathleen Walls

Buffalo Gap, Texas is a glimpse of the Wild West as it really was. Buffalo Gap was founded at the site of a natural pass through which bison herds traveled. It was a stop for cowboys on the Great Western Cattle Trail.  In the late 1800s it was the spot where buffalo hunters camped. By 1880, it had been named county seat and had a population of 200. It had the usual businesses, hotel, blacksmith shop, a general store and a saloon. Perhaps the most important building in Buffalo Gap was the Taylor County Jail and Courthouse.

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Information Highway ( a different way to promote travel)

Take a Tour

Want to visit fun places but you are not sure what to see there? How about taking a tour that is like having a friend who knows that city well along to take you to the coolest places. You can do that for under $5 now.

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Inn Roads

Retro Inn

By Kathleen Walls

Retro Inn in Cortez, Colorado takes you back in time. You might land anywhere from the 1950s to the ‘80s.  Well, not really but that is how it feels. If you plan to visit the Four Corners area of Colorado, Cortez is the perfect hub and Retro Inn is a fun place to set up your base camp while you explore the Ancestral Puebloans (AKA Anasazi) sites.  It’s about ten minutes from Mesa Verde National Park.

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Museum Stroll

Who was Andy Warhol?

By Kathleen Walls

When most Americans hear the name Andy Warhol, they think of Campbell’s Soup cans. Those Campbell’s Soup Cans paintings may be his most recognizable work but it is far from the entirety that was Andy Warhol.

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Native Trails

Mesa Verde Country- On the Trail of the Ancients

By Kathleen Walls

Ancestral Puebloans didn’t limit themselves to Mesa Verde National Park. They built dwellings throughout the four corners area. We were trying to see allof the most interesting ones so we headed for Canyon of the Ancients National Monument. It was created to protect these sites. Our guide, Jim Colleran told us to “look for sage and prickly pear cactuses growing on rubble mounds” to recognize unexcavated sites.

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On the Road with Grandma

Ahoy! Enjoy Annapolis

by Roberta Sandler

There's smooth sailing for you and your grandchildren when you visit Annapolis, Maryland. With plenty of water views and water sports, this county seat of Anne Arundel County is an invitation to fun. Annapolis is called the Sailing Capital of the World, no surprise considering that it's situated on the Chesapeake Bay. It's less than an hour from Baltimore and Washington, D. C.

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Overseas Highways

Jordan’s Baker’s Dozen Must Know~Must See 

By Kathleen Walls

There are some things a first time visitor to a special place must see. Likewise there are certain things that are important to know when venturing into a strange environment. Go with an open mind and avoid stereotypes. You will have a much more enjoyable time and learn more about the culture.  For my first visit to Jordan, here are my lists of the most important “Must See” and “Must Know” places and things. 

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Photos from the Roadside

Dam! It’s so close to Las Vegas.
I can’t believe how I missed this side trip in the past.

by Jim DeLillo

Only 35 miles from The Strip it takes less than one hour to drive there.Boulder Dam, as it was once known, is the result of a government work project that took five years to build, $49 million (1931) $777 million (2016) and twenty-one thousand men. Impressive in its stature, standing 726 feet tall and goes from 660 feet wide at the base to a mere 45 feet wide at the top. Holding back the huge volume of water stored in the reservoir weighs so much that it deformed the earth’s crust, causing more than 600 small earthquakes in the late 1930s. The Lake was formed by damming the Colorado River at Black Canyon.The purpose of which is to provide 1.5 million kilowatts of electricity to the surrounding communities in Nevada, Arizona, and southern California.

 read Photos from the Roadside- Click Here

Pot Luck

Kitchen Canisters with a Story

By Mary Emma Allen

Many of the items in your kitchen either tell a story, because they are hand-me-downs used in earlier days or are something you've collected as you've traveled.  Canisters, either as matching sets, or odd ones you've accumulated or saved because you like them, may contribute to your story or bring memories of travels.

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Rendezvous With Renee's

South Dakota's Treasures of I-29

By Renee S. Gordon

People around the globe tend to be most familiar with the western region of South Dakota, famous for the Crazy Horse Memorial, Mount Rushmore and the rugged scenery of the Badlands. Visitors who confine themselves to the region west of the Missouri, the boundary between East and West, miss not only the expansive prairie but also a plethora of sites and attractions that are culturally unique. 

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Renee's Route

Lexington Kentucky Getaway

by Renee's S. Gordon

By all accounts, Abraham Lincoln visited Kentucky four times, but most significantly, it was in Kentucky that he experienced his first vacation. In what we would now term a guy’s getaway he visited his best friend Joshua Speed in 1841 and obtained his first taste of a life of luxury. The components that make up a successful deluxe getaway have not changed much in the ensuing 175-years and Kentucky is still an ideal location to spend some time with friends and Lexington is just the right size and has such a plethora of culinary, shopping, arts and entertainment venues that everyone is bound to be pleased.

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Renee's International Route

Mexico’s Playa Mujeres Excellence Resorts

by Renee's S. Gordon

Nearly 5000 years ago Mayans migrated into the Yucatan region of Mexico and between 500 BC and 900 AD they constructed large commercial, ceremonial and religious centers. The first documented Europeans to sail into the area, although they did not land, were part of the 1513 Ponce de Leon expedition. Four years later Francisco Hernendez de Cordova, while seeking slaves, landed. Encountering indigenous people he asked where he was in Spanish. They responded in their language, “ Tetec dtan. Ma t natic a dtan,” basically, “What are you saying?”  Cordova believed they were answering his question and, hearing their words as “Yucatan”, named the land accordingly.

 

read Renee's International Route- Click Here  

Tibbs Trails and Tastes

Navigating Cultures: Odyssey to explore Mexico City

by Christine Tibbets

When UNESCO says a place is special -- paying attention pays off.  Perhaps your list of want-to-go-there World Heritage Sites is as long as mine. 

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Traditional Trails

Mission San Luis: Tallahassee's Secret Treasure

By Kathleen Walls

Mission San Luis takes you back into Florida’s early history. Not just the Spanish settlers but the Native Apalachee. Museums sometimes seem to forget that long before the Europeans arrived on this continent the natives had thriving cultures. Here, the customs, sports and a sustained lifestyle. They planted corn, beans, and squash, to complement their hunting and gathering. When the Spanish came, both groups were influenced by the other. Mission San Luis tells the story of that meshing of cultures. It’s done by docents in traditional costume who remain in character so no point talking about your smart phone or camera. Those things don’t exist here.

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Traveling Beyond Borders

The Joie de Trois-Rivieres

by Roberta Sandler

It's not that I'm squeamish about staying in a centuries-old jail. It's just that I'd rather enjoy the comforts of a hotel.

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Vagabond Traveler

The Lure of Scenic Waterfalls  

By Mary Emma Allen

Waterfalls, wherever they are in the world, seem to capture the attention of travelers.  They go out of their way to travel to these cascading tumbles of water, whether the falls are long narrow streams or a wide expanse like Niagara Falls.  Some falls may simply be a tumble of water over a dam, while others are famed and draw visitors from far and near.  

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See the USA with Warren

Touring Historic Savannah, Georgia

by Warren Resen

Pre-Civil War Savannah was called the most picturesque and serene city in America.  Today it is a reminder of what many consider to have been the epitome of a society in gentler times as portrayed by Hollywood.  

 

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Wild Roads

A Visit  to Abilene Zoo

By Kathleen Walls

In the wild west of Abilene Texas, you expect to find a lot of wild. The Abilene Zoo doesn’t disappoint. It is filled with wild life. One of the first stops in the zoo has to be Wetlands of the Americas.

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Summer 2016

Adirondack Trail Mix

Exploring Country Stores, Part 1: Hoss’s  Country Corner Store

By Persis Granger

You’ll find center of Long Lake, New York, at the intersection of state routes 30 and 28N, and presiding over that intersection is Hoss’s Country Corner Store,  a must-see for travelers.

 

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Adirondack Trail Mix 2

Exploring Country Stores, Part 2: Some Favorite Things Gallery

By Persis Granger

You’ll find the small hamlet of Hadley, NY, connected to its larger neighboring hamlet, Lake Luzerne, by a bridge over the Hudson at tumbling, churning Rockwell Falls. A stone’s throw away is a small new train station, part of the Saratoga and North Creek Railway. Hadley is perched at the confluence of the Hudson and Sacandaga Rivers, a breathtaking site that is spanned by two bridges, one, the recently-restored historic Bow Bridge, and the other, higher up, a railroad bridge over which once rumbled passenger and freight aboard the Delaware and Hudson Railroad, and now still used by the Saratoga and North Creek. This town that is so steeped in history and natural Adirondack wonders is the perfect site for Some Favorite Things Gallery, a gift shop in which each item is as fresh and unique as the wildflowers along a mountain trail.

 

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Agri Lanes

Looking out for Mother Earth: Feynan Eco Lodge

by Kathleen Walls

Most agri tourism destinations promote a single product such as a winery, a farm visit, a dairy and so on. Feynan Eco Lodge promotes and supports an entire eco culture. The oh-too-short time I spent there was the most sustainable experience I ever experienced.

 

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Art Trails

Celebrate American Craft Week

by Anne Jenkins

When all 50 states join together for a celebration of craft, artisans and handmade in America, the echoes reach the far corners from small towns, rural backwaters to bustling cities. American Craft Week (ACW) surfaced about 7 years ago because there is so much creativity and excellent crafts produced in the U.S. but the industry did not have a special way to highlight the work. Not surprisingly Diane Sulg and Sherry Masters, the driving forces behind the event, live in North Carolina, an artisan state if ever there was one. Apart from all the town's celebrations listed on the ACW website, they also hold a vote in poll for the Top Ten Art Towns and this year a list of nominated "Rising Stars, 30 under 30" heralding young crafters on the up and up, will be announced later in the year.

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Chuckwagon Roundup

Sweet Treats

by Kathleen Walls

Nothing can turn a dignified adult into a kid faster than ice cream and candy. So let’s track down some of my favorites.  Here are some really sweet shops I have visited in the past few years.

 

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Civil Rights Trails

Puttin' on the Ritz

by Kathleen Walls

The original Ritz Theater was constructed in 1929 when Black entertainers followed what was called the “Chittlin’ Circuit” and African Americans could not walk into any theater to see a show like other citizens.  Ritz Theater was built in Art Deco Style and was the center of the LaVilla neighborhood. It was rebuilt in 1999 and all that remain of the historic building are the sign and the Northwest corner of the building.

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Desert Drive

Wadi Rum: The Ultimate Desert

by Kathleen Walls

It’s known as the Valley of the Moon. The landscape of Wadi Rum is so exotic it might well be on some ancient orbiting rock.  When we first ventured out into it in rugged old four-wheel drive pickups driven by Bedouins who appeared as tough and self-reliant as their vehicles, the pavement rapidly disappeared behind us. We faced unending sand punctuated by strangely eroded mountains that seemed older than time.

 

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Elite Street Eats

Nefetari’s: A Royal Dining Experience

By Kathleen Walls

Can you imagine dining like Egyptian Royalty of ancient times? You can actually do it at Nefetari’s Restaurant in Tallahassee. Not only is the food healthy and delicious, the decor is a feast for the eyes. One of the first things you see is a stuffed lion named Maliki near the entrance. The entire restaurant is filled with Egyptian and African art. It’s a mini-museum.

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Fork in The Road

Now You're Cooking~ Petra Kitchen

By Kathleen Walls

What fun to eat in a restaurant where you get to prepare you own meal under the eye of a watchful chef before dining. It’s even better when the recipes are local favorites from an exotic country you are visiting for the first time. I got to do just that on a recent trip to Jordan when we experienced Petra Kitchen.

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Globe Trotting with Warren

India

Article by Warren Resen
Photos by Jeanne O'Connor

India, as portrayed in slick travel magazines is a microcosm of a much larger, much more diverse culture. Yes, there are five-star hotels, restaurants, and world-class resorts there but is it really necessary to travel half way around the world for something you probably have at home?

 

read Globe Trotting with Warren- Click Here

 

Happy Trails

“There’s Gold in Them Thar [Georgia] Hills”

By Tom Straka

The lead photograph is a vertical mine shaft that leads to the famous gold vein in Dahlonega, Georgia. What famous gold vein? Dahlonega is an unusual tourist town that will introduce you to some unusual southern history which includes some of the nation’s earliest gold mining history.  As an example of what I mean by unusual, that mine shaft is in a family-style restaurant, The Smith House, located a block off the town’s main square. During renovations workers found the shaft in the restaurant’s basement. Not all the attractions in town are free, but viewing the mine shaft will cost you nothing. 

read Happy Trails - Click Here

Information Highway ( a different way to promote travel)

Take a Tour

Want to visit fun places but you are not sure what to see there? How about taking a tour that is like having a friend who knows that city well along to take you to the coolest places. You can do that for under $5 now.

read Information Highway - Click Here

 

Inn Roads

Kempinski Hotel Ishtar: Beyond Five-Star Luxury

By Kathleen Walls

The Dead Sea area of Jordan is filled with luxury resorts but one stands out. Kempinski Hotel Ishtar Resort welcomed us, refreshed us, fed us and made our stay memorable.

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Museum Stroll

Touch of Old Florida: The Tallahassee Museum

By Kathleen Walls

With most museums, you expect to find all the exhibits tucked away neatly in a building. Tallahassee Musuem is so different. It’s like a time capsule of Tallahassee’s (and Florida’s) cultural and natural history all set in a natural outdoor environment on the shores of Lake Bradford.

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Native Trails

Mesa Verde Country: On the Trail of the Ancients: Part One

By Kathleen Walls

Some of American’s most intriguing mysteries surround the Anasazi culture of Mesa Verde. Modern Anthropology is uncovering many secrets about these ancient people including the fact that they are the ancestors of the modern day Pueblo tribes, thus the name has been changed. Today, they are called Ancient Puebloans. Anasazi is a Navajo word meaning “Ancient People” or “Ancient Enemy” and offensive to the Pueblo tribes.

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On the Road with Grandma

Finding Family Fun in Columbus, Ohio

by Roberta Sandler

Columbus is such a lively city with so many family-friendly attractions and cultural venues that it easily finds a place on the list of best American cities to visit.

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Photos from the Roadside

Blueberry Thrill in Washington State

by Jim DeLillo

I reach in tentatively, cautiously.  My outstretched finger gently touches the sphere. Then gently giving a little tug the blue tidbit comes free in my hand.

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Pot Luck

A Taste for Tea

By Mary Emma Allen

For relaxation or as a way to start the day, a cup of tea can't be beat.  Even though I sometimes drink coffee, I prefer tea such as English Breakfast tea, Awake tea and Earl Grey tea, to name a few.  Drinking tea has long been a tradition in my family, something my grandmother and mother enjoyed  with family and friends.

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Quiet Roads

A House With a Soul

by Kathleen Walls

Some houses are so unique they seem to have a soul. You feel it when you first look at them. You feel it even more when you step inside. Since houses are just bricks, wood or stone, that soul must come in part for the architect who designs the house and in part from those who envision it  and make it their home. 

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Renee's Route

Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, Gateway to Adventure

by Renee' S. Gordon

Virginia’s 140-miles long Shenandoah Valley lies between the Allegheny and the Blue Ridge Mountains. This incredibly beautiful region has been a staging ground for history since the 1600s and for Native Americans for approximately 11,000 years prior to that. The Chester and Manassas Gaps afforded natural access for people and goods into the valley where they could transport goods via the Shenandoah River.

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Renee's International Route

Uniquely Flanders  

by Renee' S. Gordon

Modern Flanders, a region in north Belgium, is one of the most historic, beautiful, architecturally distinctive and intriguing regions in Europe.  The name is derived from the County of Flanders, a medieval principality that existed from the mid-800s to 1795 and was made up of Northern Belgium and a portion of northern France. Flanders is bordered by the Netherlands and a North Sea shoreline that extends 42-miles. Because of its strategic position in the heart of Europe the area has been involved in every major European conflict including both World Wars. Despite the years of occupation and carnage Flandriens have maintained a distinct character and culture that is both unique and accessible.

 

read Renee's International Route- Click Here  

 

Tibbs Trails and Tastes

First: Why travel to Jordan?
Second: What remarkable connections will the trip reveal?
 

by Christine Tibbets

Jordan is a lyrical country where music filters within routine daily chores as often as it wafts across landscapes both lush and dry. Listen as you wander. 

read Tibbs Trails- Click Here  

 

Traditional Trails

Life in a Bedouin Tent

By Kathleen Walls 

Imagine living life as it was 2000 years ago. Some cultures still live a life very similar to the way they were then. On a recent trip to Jordan, I got to meet an elder of a Bedouin tribe and his family.

read Traditional Trail- Click Here

 Traveling Beyond Borders

Exploring the Outskirts of Edinburgh

By Roberta Sandler

Your cruise ship has just sailed into one of Edinburgh, Scotland's four ports, and you're eager to disembark for a day of exploring. Or, you've arrived for a vacation in Edinburgh via plane or car and you're looking for attractions to visit. 

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Vagabond Traveler

Old Foundations, Stone Walls & Byways 

By Mary Emma Allen

Traveling over old byways or walking along those no longer passable fascinates me.  Often in these travels, we come across abandoned home sites and foundations, as well as stone walls.  Most of these abandoned towns in New England consist of fallen foundations, steps leading to doorways that no longer exist, old barns and sheds, lilac bushes, rose bushes and apple trees. Perhaps you'll find the remnants of a church or town meeting hall.   

 

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Wet Roads

Maryland's Western Shore  

by Renee' S. Gordon

The Chesapeake Bay was created approximately 10,000-years ago from melting glaciers and it is home to 238 varieties of finfish, 173 species of shellfish and nearly 3,000 plant types. It is the largest estuary in the country and the third largest in the world flowing 200-miles with 11,684-miles of shoreline. The bay is a narrow waterway bisecting Maryland that is part of the Atlantic Ocean. The towns and villages located on the western shore are a fishing, hiking, boating paradise that has unique offerings for history lovers and those seeking a peaceful getaway.

 

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The Spring 2016 Edition of American Roads and Global Highways


 

Adirondack Trail Mix

The Lake George Elvis Festival ~ June 1 – 5, 2016
By Persis Granger

Elvis has left the building? Lake George Village, in the southern Adirondacks of New York state, would beg to differ! This small village springs to life during the first week of June with a five-day celebration of the “King of Rock ‘n’ Roll.” Tribute artists from far and near descend upon the Adirondacks to shake, rattle and roll to honor the life and perpetuate the legacy of Elvis Presley along the shore of the “Queen of America’s Lakes”, the pristine 32-mile-long mountain-rimmed Lake George. Although the setting is serene, you can be sure that, during the festival, there will be no peace in that valley

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Agri Lanes

Riding the Tide: Great Raft Brewery

by Kathleen Walls

There is nothing like a “Produced in the USA” tag on a food product to remind us of our country’s agricultural roots. Since pre-colonial days, beer has been part of the American culture. Native Americans brewed a type of beer from corn, birch sap and water. But beer as we know it today began with the brewing traditions brought from England and the Netherlands in Colonial days. Ale was the traditional brews found in early pubs. Then in the 19th century, German immigrants brought with them a culture of creating lagers.

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Art Trails

Living History, Modern Art

by Anne Jenkins

Conjure up a trip to Williamsburg, Va., and history immediately springs to mind. The neatly restored town perfectly chronicles the early history of the United States, complete with docents dressed in period costume and dusty wide streets.  And while it is very essential, interesting and educational to 'live' history, there is another side to Colonial Williamsburg. An exciting and modern arts and crafts industry hides in plain sight in in the area.  

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Chuckwagon Roundup

 Prize Pizzas


by Kathleen Walls

Pizza was long a favorite in Italy’s poorer sections. In the early 18th century Italian emigrants brought their favorite comfort food to the United States but it remained mostly a local dish served in Italian communities. Pizza popularity grew with the returning WW2 soldiers who had occupied Italy and discovered pizza as a welcome change for rations during the war. For the first time, restaurants serving pizza and chains specializing in the delectable pies sprang up outside of the old Italian neighborhoods and were welcomed with open arms. Here are a few fantastic pizza places I have visited lately.

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Civil Rights Trails

Tallahassee's Spirit of Smokey Hollow

by Kathleen Walls

 Founded in the 1890s close to downtown, Smokey Hollow  was home to many of Tallahassee’s working class African Americans. It was a safe comfortable place where neighbors were like family until the 1960s.Then, as Tallahassee entered the period of the Civil Right movement. sweeping its reforms across American, everything changed.

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Dark Trails

Mount Sinai Adventure

By Warren Resen

Traveling to the Holy Land is a once-in-a-lifetime experience for most people. No matter what your beliefs, the trip is an amazing adventure.

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Elite Street Eats

The Edison is Lighting up Tallahassee

By Kathleen Walls

Thomas Edison once stated, “The doctor of the future will give no medication, but will interest his patients in the care of the human frame, diet and in the cause and prevention of disease.” Perhaps he had a restaurant like his namesake, The Edison, in mind.

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Fork in The Road

Zydeco's: A Touch of Louisiana in Indiana

By Kathleen Walls

The last thing you expect to find in Mooresville, Indiana is a genuine Cajun restaurant but there it is right in the heart of Hoosier country, a little piece of Acadiana called Zydeco. Actually it’s more than Cajun it’s a little bit of New Orleans best Creole cooking rolled up with Lafayette, Breau Bridge, Thibodaux’s Cajun and Zydeco style and all of South Louisiana thrown in for fun.

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Happy Trails

Bennett Place~~The Surrender after Appomattox Court House

By Tom Straka

You probably think the last surrender of the Civil War took place at Appomattox Court House. Not so, there were several others as Confederate troops further south and west surrendered. Confederate President Jefferson Davis did not want the war to end with Appomattox. By early-April 1865 it was apparent that the Civil War was drawing to a close. General William T. Sherman and his Union troops had finished their march to the sea and were now marching through the Carolinas. Columbia, South Carolina was burned in mid-February and in mid-March Sherman’s objective in North Carolina became clear; he was headed to Goldboro to linkup with 30,000 additonal Union troops moving west from the coast.  Goldsboro was important as it openned the door to Raleigh and the important rail lines going north (the rail line that supplied the besieged Army of Northern Virginia). Sherman hoped to move north rapidly and join in the expected surrender of  General Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia.

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Information Highway ( a different way to promote travel)

Wild About Florida

When you visit Florida, there is so much natural beauty to see. Wild About Florida by Kathleen and Martin Walls gives you a glimpse of all of the fun and natural places in Florida everyone would love to visit but doesn't know that they exist.

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Inn Roads

Barrymore Hotel. A Local Flavorite

By Kathleen Walls

Are you one of those people who book at chain hotels? If so you could be missing out on a lot of local flavor. Barrymore Hotel in Tampa is a perfect example. Once part of a chain, this boutique hotel in Tampa’s Downtown River Arts District, is a unique cultural experience not just a place to lay your head.

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Photos from the Roadside

Coronado National Forest and Chiricahua National Monument,
Willcox, Arizona

By Jim DiLillio

Red dust kicked up behind my wheels as I hugged the inner curve of the dirt road. Through the passenger-side window on my right, I could just make out the 1500-foot drop to the gorge below. 

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Museum Stroll

Smithsonian, Texas Style

By Kathleen Walls

Panhandle Plains Historical Museum calls itself “The Smithsonian with a Texas accent.” It’s pretty close to right. It is a fantastic museum and it’s located on Texas A and M University Campus in Canyon, Texas so it definitely has a Texas accent.

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Music Row

Tallahassee Blues

By Kathleen Walls

Our group leader, Laura, led us down a winding dirt road just wide enough for a car that looked like the scene of some B grade horror movie. As the road petered out we saw a small, cinderblock building with a huge bonfire blazing behind it. Instead of being slashed by a monster at the end of the road, we reached one of Tallahassee’s best-kept-secret fun spots, The Bradfordville Blues Club. 

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On the Road with Grandma

Sarasota: Fun in a Cultural Breadbasket

by Roberta Sandler

What kid doesn't like going to the circus? For that matter, what kid-at-heart doesn't have fond childhood memories of watching the animals and performers under the Big Top?

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Pot Luck

Quilting Bees and Teas

By Mary Emma Allen

Quilting bees and gatherings often become a winter pasttime...occasions to gather socially, work on projects and enjoy tea and cookies.  This has been an activity for generations and continues today among my daughter and her friends.  Some quilters travel distances to  attend workshops, shows and gatherings.  

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Photos from the Side of the Road

by Jim Delillo

Red dust kicked up behind my wheels as I hugged the inner curve of the dirt road. Through the passenger-side window on my right, I could just make out the 1500-foot drop to the gorge below. 

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Renee's Route

Smooth Travels: African American Heritage Trail in Northern NY

by Renee's S. Gordon

In 1613 what is believed to be the first permanent settler in New Netherlands, now New York City, was put ashore from a Dutch sailing ship. Jan Rodrigues, a free man of color from Santo Domingo carried with him tools and provisions and was tasked with establishing trade with the Indians for the Dutch. His presence is documented because the following year legal problems arose with fur traders. Rodrigues married a native and when the Dutch returned for him he chose to stay and establish his own trading post. In commemoration in 2012 Broadway between 158th and 218th Streets was designated Juan Rodriguez Way.

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Renee's Route International

El Dorado, Bogot and Cartagena, Colombia

by Renee's S. Gordon

It is estimated that during the slave trade approximately 12.5-million Africans were taken from Africa with an estimated 10.7-million completing the voyage to the Americas and only about 10% of those captured taken directly to North America. The coastal area of Colombia, South America was such a large and lucrative slave port that more than 300,000 Africans passed through the city. Today Colombia’s current black population is the 2nd largest in South America and the 3rd largest outside of the continent of Africa.  

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See the USA with Warren

Blowing Rock, North Carolina

by Warren Resen

Have you ever wondered where many of the place names displayed on road signs originated?  Was a city, town, or historical site named for a founding father, a geographical feature, historical event, or something else that brought this area into prominence?  Names tell a story and the story is not always obvious. 

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Tibbs Trails and Tastes

Consider a Trail of Excellence Combining Some Riveria Resorts

by Christine Tibbets

Staying put is enticing once the slog of air travel is accomplished but I discovered a slew of alluring reasons to roam from one all-inclusive resort to another on a Cancun vacation.

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Vagabond Traveler

Following the Quilting Trail

By Mary Emma Allen

Designing and making quilts can be exciting and satisfying in itself.  However, an added reward is attending quilt workshops and shows around your home area and in various parts of the country.  In the course of my quilting, both making quilts and writing about them, I've been involved in events nearby and those as I traveled. 

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Wild Road

Lowry Park Zoo Revistied

Kathleen Walls

It has been years since I visited Tampa’s Lowry Park Zoo so I was presently surprised at all the improvements made to an already wonderful facility when I visited with my daughter a short time ago. Also, pleased at all the new additions to some of the animal families.

 

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Lagniappe

 A little something extra just for you. 

 

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2016 Winter Edition  

 

 

Adirondack Trail Mix

A visit to Lake George Winter Carnival

By Persis Granger

Many summer visitors to the Adirondacks’ Lake George area look around during the summer festivities, and then ask natives, “So what do you do around here in the winter? Hibernate?”

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Agri Lanes

Little Piece of Heaven: Oliver Winery

by Kathleen Walls

What would you call a place that offered great wine tastings, tours, music, a beautiful garden and even some pet friendly events? No I haven’t discovered Nirvana. It’s Oliver Winery in Bloomington, Indiana I’m thinking about. I visited it with Travel Media Showcase and was thrilled with both the beauty and the fruits of the vine found there in equal parts.

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Ancient Traces

Good Bones: Waco Mammoth National Monument

by Kathleen Walls

On July 10, 2015, President Obama created three new National Monuments. One of these sites protect some of the most important paleontological finds in American History, Waco Mammoth National Monument.

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Art Trails

Art Town Tour

by Anne Jenkins

Cold, snowy winter weather provides the perfect time to plan a spring road trip to see some cool local art. Art towns, big and small, around the country are well known. There's a book listing the top 100 best art towns. American Craft Week held a vote-in competition for the best art town during their 2015 event. Some town names keep popping up in all the lists, like Asheville, N.C., Berea, Ky., Sante Fe, NM., Eureka Springs, Ark., Saugatuck, Mich., and as far as States are concerned North Carolina and Vermont  always top everyone's list. These are all excellent choices, Asheville and Berea are among my favorites and Vermont is definitely a wonderland of art. But I am going to give you a few fresh ideas. Get the atlas out and start plotting and planning.

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Chuckwagon Roundup

Delicious Diners

by Kathleen Walls

 

Diners were the American fast food joints of the early 20th century. They began in the 1870s and were the most popular eatery of the middle class until the 1970s with the coming of the fast food chains that are so popular with younger people who think a McBurger is high cuisine. 

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Civil Rights Trails

Birth of the Civil Rights Movement

by Kathleen Walls

 In 1606 an event happened that was little noted and not long remembered but it was of great historical importance.  The Cathedral Archives in St. Augustine recorded the birth of the first African American child in the continental United States. This was 13 years before the first enslaved Africans were brought to the English colony of Jamestown in 1619. It was the first spark in the fight for civil rights for African Americans.

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Exploring With Eleanor

Ahoy, Annapolis

By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel

Like the tides, the coastline of Annapolis flows in and out of the country’s largest estuary, Chesapeake Bay. Not only is the city the capital of Maryland, but it’s also “America’s Sailing Capital.” In or out of the water, you’re in for a nautical experience.

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Elite Street Eats

Broussards: A New Orleans Tradition

By Kathleen Walls

Since 1920, Broussard’s has been considered one of the Grand Dames of New Orleans restaurants. Our server, Adam Martinez, told us a little about Broussard’s history.  The restaurant began with Joseph Broussard and his wife, Rosalie Borrello. The owner of Antoine’s was a friend and brought Joseph with him to Paris one summer where the young chef got his classical training. When he returned home and married Rosalie, his father-in-law gifted them with the Borrello family mansion on Conti Street. This allowed Joseph to have his longtime dream, a restaurant of his own. His combination of classic French dishes with his own Louisiana Creole style guaranteed him success.

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Fork in The Road

LeBleu's Landing

By Kathleen Walls

If you’re looking for a real Cajun food experience, you can find it at LeBleu’s Landing in Sulphur, Louisiana.

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Guest Corridor

Chocolate Trail

by Kathy Barnett

 If you are a chocoholic like me, the place to go and satisfy your craving is Richmond, Indiana’s Chocolate Trail. The best thing about this destination is that you can take the self-guided tour any time of the year.  

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Guest Corridor 2

Monsters at Borrego Springs--Photographing the Milky Way 

by Jim DeLillo

    A warm wind blows across me, but I still feel a chill run down my back. I'm alone in the desert. I’m at one of the darkest places on earth according to my map. It's a little scary, especially while visions of coyotes, scorpions, and roving gangs of desert hares dance in my head. I'm here to photograph monsters. It isn't my imagination. I saw them as I drove in during the day. Standing as tall as two stories, I could make out their rust-colored silhouettes against the arid sand.   

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Happy Trails

Pennsylvania Dutch Village and Farm Museum

By Tom Straka

Photographs by Pat Straka

Southeastern Pennsylvania brings to mind Amish country, but it is just as much Pennsylvania Dutch country. The German word for “German’ is Deutsch and from that is how the Pennsylvania Germans came to be called the Pennsylvania Dutch.  The late 1600s and 1700s was a time of European turmoil and waves of German-speaking immigrants came to the region, making up 40% of its population by the late 1700s. Around places like Lancaster the German-speaking population was about 70%. Today, Lancaster is one of the best places in the country to learn about the Pennsylvania Dutch culture and history.  

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Information Highway ( a different way to promote travel)

Wild About Florida

When you visit Florida, there is so much natural beauty to see. Wild About Florida by Kathleen and Martin Walls gives you a glimpse of all of the fun and natural places in Florida everyone would love to visit but doesn't know that they exist.

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Inn Roads

Stay and Play

By Kathleen Walls

Planning a vacation to Louisiana in the future? When you are choosing a hotel consider staying at a casino. You say you don’t gamble. Still casinos are a good choice for several reasons even for family vacations. They offer reasonable prices and all the advantages of a resort.  There are always restaurants for every taste and budget. Shops and entertainment abound in casino. The ever important swimming pool is usually offered in several versions. For those who do wish to indulge in the gaming the opportunities are limitless. You will have a confortable visit, you can bet on it.

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Museum Stroll

Time Tripping at the Mayborn Museum

By Kathleen Walls

Mayborn Museum in Waco, Texas is filled with interesting things for young and old alike: a place for the scholar or the fun seeker. It's a fun trip back in time, It has indoor exhibits and great outdoor historical village. It opened in 2004 as a blending of the former Strecker Museum, a Children’s Discovery Center and the Outdoor Village all situated at different places originally.

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Music Row

Cajun or Zydeco?

By Kathleen Walls

Is it Cajun or Zydeco? That’s the most common question folks ask when they hear Louisiana music. Well, Cajun music is the “folk music” of the Arcadian people exiled from Canada who settled mostly in southern Louisiana. It will usually have fiddles along with an accordion, and guitars. Modern Cajun music has borrowed some from County and Western.

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On the Road with Grandma

On the Road to a Family Cruise

by Roberta Sandler

When it comes to vacations, nothing excites my grandchildren as much as getting on the road and heading for a cruise port for a vacation at sea.

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Renee's Route

Alexandria, Virginia

by Renee's S. Gordon

There are cities older than Alexandria, Virginia and cities that have witnessed as many of America’s major historical events but there are no other colonial cities that experienced history in such a personal way and none that can as readily evoke the sense of historical immediacy. Archeology has proven that humans existed in the Alexandria region for at least 13,000-years. The earliest Native Americans hunted and eventual developed settlements near the Patawomeck Flu, Potomac River. In 1654 the first documented patent for 700-acres of land belonged to Margaret Brent, a Maryland resident and first colonial woman to become a landowner.

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See the USA with Warren

AMERICA’S MOST REMOTE NATIONAL PARK


by Warren Resen Photos by Jeanne O'Conner

If you found yourself on an island in the Gulf of Mexico 70 miles west of Key West, where do you think you might be...in another country, or perhaps another state? You would still be in the USA and in Florida and on Garden Key in the Dry Tortugas visiting Ft. Jefferson.

 

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Street Party

Party Like it's 1565

by Kathleen Walls

When it comes to throwing a big birthday bash, nobody tops Saint Augustine. Then, no other city in the country has been around for 450 years. For the big 450 Celebration they pulled out all the stops. When the planning started they asked all the usual questions. Bands? Let’s get some of the best names. Stage?  How about five? Weekend festival? No let’s carry it over for four days from the Friday of Labor Day Weekend until Tuesday, September 8, the actual birthday.

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Tibbs Tastes and Trails

Follow the Film Trail in Louisiana North

By Christine Tibbetts

Movie travel offers way more than peering at some places where a favorite film launched, or so I discovered in Louisiana

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Wet Roads

The Anthem of the Seas, A Technological Wonder

by Renee S. Gordon

Cruising has provided a popular escape for thousands of years, think Caesar and Cleopatra, but historians tend to trace the history of passenger, ocean cruising for personal enjoyment, to an imaginative article penned in the early 1830s by Arthur Anderson. Almost concurrent with its publication steamships were introduced and ocean cruising took on an aura of the ultimate in glamour and wealth. Cunard, the most famous of the early cruise lines, established a reputation for sophistication that lasted until their allure was surpassed by the ability to take a transatlantic flight. World Wars I and II made cruising difficult for the obvious reasons and because many of the ships were conscripted for the war effort. It was not until the late 1960s that the popularity of passenger cruising surged, spurred by the growing number of activities offered onboard and some believe the fun and frolic depicted on the 1970’s sitcom “The Love Boat”.

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Wild Roads

The Bear Facts

by Kathleen Walls

The American Black Bear has a wide range. They are found along the eastern seaboard of North America from Alaska to Northern Mexico and in parts of western United States. They are very adaptable so they have learned to survive in closer proximity to humans than many other wild creatures. This very trait that helped them survive for millions of years, now is putting them on the path to extinction.

 

 

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Lagniappe

 A little something extra just for you. From trolly rides to Europe and beyond.  Check it out. 

 

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The Fall 2015 Edition of American Roads Magazine  

 

American Roads is proud to present the Fall 2015  Edition of American Roads Magazine.      



 

Adirondack Trail Mix  

A Visit to Historic Fort Ticonderoga – An Immersion Experience

By Persis Granger

We arrived at Fort Ticonderoga on a photo album summer morning, the kind with azure sky polka-dotted with cauliflower clouds. Bright sunlight danced on the waters of Lake Champlain that tickled the sides of the Ticonderoga peninsula. It would have been enough just to sit and soak up the mountain scenery, but there lay ahead the imposing star-shaped Fort, and our crew had adventure in mind.

 

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Agri Lanes

Busy as a Bee: A visit to Hunter's Honey Farm

by Kathleen Walls

Hunter’s Honey Farm can trace its beginnings of managing bees and harvesting nature’s liquid gold for more than a century. Gilbert Perigo, the farm and family patriarch, began beekeeping while he was still in high school in Boonville, Indiana and by 1910, was using several hives to pollinate the family apple orchard. In 1951, Gilbert retired from teaching and moved his family to Mooresville, Indiana. There, he began what you find today at Hunter’s Honey Farm. 

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Art Trails

Art of the Battlefield

by Anne Jenkins

At the end of July I visited the Panhandle of West Virginia to find out more about Over the Mountain Studio Tour held in Jefferson County every fall. They host a 2-day preview exhibit in Shepherdstown to give you a sampling of the art offered during the studio tour later in the year. I not only got a great impression of the art and artists, I also discovered a fascinating artist tale just across the Maryland border at Antietam National Battlefield.

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ByRoads

Only in Louisiana

by Kathleen Walls

Traveling in the United States, Louisiana is the closest you can come to visiting a foreign country. So much of their food, culture and heritage is found only in Louisiana.

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Chuckwagon Roundup

Ghostly Gourmets:
Haunted Restaurants of the South

by Kathleen Walls

Some restaurants have a lot of spirits. I mean that literally. A few of the restaurants I visited have their very own ghostly gourmets still wandering the kitchens and dining rooms.

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Civil Rights Trails

Hitching a Ride on the Underground Railroad

by Kathleen Walls

“You can’t really understand another person’s experience until you’ve walked a mile in their shoes.” There is no way to walk in the shoes of an African Slave in the Antebellum South or hitch a ride on the Underground Railroad today but a visit to Slave Haven in Memphis is as close as you can come.

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Civil War Trails

Fayetteville's Civil War Heritage:
The Beginning of the End

by Kathleen Walls

Fayetteville, North Carolina boasts about 35 markers and sited related to The War Between the States in the area. I would consider the ones below a “must see” for Civil War buffs.

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Elite Street Eats  

Antoine's: A Living Legend

By Kathleen Walls

 It’s hard for any restaurant to stand out at the head of the pack in a city filled with outstanding restaurants like New Orleans,  Yet, if you ask the experts to name some of New Orleans best restaurants, Antoine’s will always be on the list. It's been way up there for a long time, 175 years of French Creole culinary traditions to be exact.

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Exploring with Eleanor  

A Southern Foodie Cooks in Wisconsin

By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel 

I just became a Southerner when I relocated to Florida. But I grew up on “down-home” southern cooking. My northern mother learned to cook from her southern mother. So naturally, I cook mostly southern-style. Living in Italy had added to my kitchen expertise. But I wanted to expand my culinary horizon even more. So when I heard about a couple of cooking classes in Wisconsin, I thought it would be worth a try.

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Fork in The Road  

Dine like Royalty at The Crown

By Kathleen Walls

The Crown in Indianola, Mississippi is a lot more than a restaurant. they  also bill themselves as "an Art Gallery full of fabulous original Delta art, a Gift Shop filled with classic children’s toys and gifts for every occasion and a Bookstore." You could browse for hours but we came to dine so the browsing was limited.

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Guest Corridor

Along the Old Cattle Trail

by Kathy Barnett

By car today, driving from  Bandera, Tx. to Sedalia, Mo. takes a little over 13 hours – a good day’s drive if you are in a hurry. However, back in the days of the Great Western Cattle Trail, it took much longer for cowboys to drive their herds to the end of the railroad where they were shipped back East to the markets. By following Interstate 35 through through Austin and Waco, our first stop is in Dallas.      

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Happy Trails

Moundsville, West Virginia: More than Mounds

By Tom Straka
Photographs by Patricia A. Straka

Sometimes you stumble on to an interesting place without even planning on it.  Moundsville, just south of Wheeling in West Virginia’s panhandle, between Pennsylvania and Ohio, is one of those places. The name comes from the many Native American mounds in the area and largest and most prominent one, the Grave Creek Mound, is in the center of town on the main thoroughfare. A state historical marker gives the details of the original dimensions, the moat, and an early tunnel into the mound’s interior.

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Historic Trails

Roots of Natchitoches:
Fort St. Jean Baptiste

By Kathleen Walls

Most people when asked about the oldest city in Louisiana would guess New Orleans. They would be wrong. Natchitoches is four years the senior. The city of Natchitoches grew from two simple huts to become Fort St. Jean Baptiste des Natchitoches. The city grew around the fort and became a primary French trading post.

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Information Highway ( a different way to promote travel)

Wild About Florida

When you visit Florida, there is so much natural beauty to see. Wild About Florida by Kathleen and Martin Walls gives you a glimpse of all of the fun and natural places in Florida everyone would love to visit but doesn't know that they exist.

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Inn Roads

The Village at Indian Point

By Kathleen Walls

When you visit Branson, you expect everything to be special. The Village at Indian Point doesn’t disappoint. It is beautiful, peaceful and has every amenity you want. To top that, it is located close to Silver Dollar City. It’s not technically in the city of Branson but is located on beautiful Table Rock Lake on Indian Point Peninsula.

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Literary Trails

The Mystic of Ancient Books: A Visit to the Lilly Library

By Kathleen Walls

There is something captivating about books. Even modern ones. When you touch a book, you touch many different lives, the characters that inhabit the book as well as the author who created the book. However, ancient books are even more magical. I recently had an experience any book lover would be thrilled to experience. I visited the Lilly Library on the campus of Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana.

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Movie Trails

Where's The Help

By Kathleen Walls

Skeeter is still in Greenwood, Mississippi. No, not the character played by Emma Stone in The Help, one of the most popular movies of 2011. This Skeeter is a small gray dog and she resides with Webb Franklin in his home at 613 River Road in Greenwood.

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Museum Stroll

A Capitol Idea: Louisiana's Capitol Park Museum

By Kathleen Walls

Capitol Park Museum is the place to visit first if you are a newbie visiting Louisiana for the first time. It’s relatively new museum, opened in 2006 shortly after Katrina so it is all state of the art and Disneyesque in its scale. Kids will be fascinated as well as adults.  It really covers the state from the days of the Louisiana Purchase to present. The museum, with 70,000 square feet of spectacular exhibits, is the largest in Baton Rouge.

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Off the Road

On the Road Again

By Kathleen Walls

For those of us who have done our share of RVing, only one thing is more fun than an  nostalgic look at an antique or classic RV and that is an entire museum devoted to these land rovers of the past. Amarillo, Texas is home to Jack Sisemore RV Museum. To sweeten the nostalgia pot, the RV Museum is located just a short distance off the "Mother Road" for all roadies, Route 66. Best of all. It's free.

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On the Road with Grandma

Winston-Salem: An unexpected treat for Grandkids

by Roberta Sandler

Who would have guessed that Winston-Salem is a great vacation destination for grandparents and their grandchildren?

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Product Review

CardNinja Smartphone Wallet

by Kathleen Walls

Ever have trouble juggling you phone case and wallet or purse? I recently was given a product to review that make the task a lot easier. CardNinja Smartphone Wallet is a simple devise but very useful.

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Potluck

Squash- A Bounty of Fall

 By Mary Emma Allen

With autumn upon us and holidays not far away, we plan for the many festive meals we may be serving.  Many of them include squash in some form...baked, steamed, sauteed, in casseroles, pies and even cookies.  Winter squash, in its many shapes and varieties, makes a hit.  This hard tough covered vegetable will save into the winter when stored in a dark, dry place.

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Renee's Route

Look Again at Louisville

by Renee S. Gordon

Every state has a unique story that explains how it developed into the place we visit today. Geography is the single largest determinate and the character of the people drawn to the area are the next most important factor. The region we know as Kentucky has always been a haven for individuals of strong opinions and personal moral commitment. The state, with its key position on the border between the North and South, was the only state to be represented with a star on the flag of the Union and the Confederacy during the Civil War and both Abraham Lincoln, the President of the Union and Jefferson Davis, the President of the Confederacy, were born in Kentucky.  To delve deeper into the state’s story, one can elect to follow one of the numerous thematic trails created by the state or “go rogue” and tour some of the lesser-touted sites. Considering what Kentucky is all about that is the only way to go.

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Street Party

Music in Mayberry

 by Kathleen Walls

If you’re a Mayberry kind of person who enjoys old-fashioned fun and music, you want to be in Danville, Indiana on the third Saturday of each month from June thru September for Summer Sounds on the Square. You will feel like you took a time machine ride and emerged in Mayberry, the iconic small town home of the Andy Griffin Show.

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Tibs Trails and Tastes

Sweetwater County, Wyoming    
Flaming Gorges, Wild Horses, Vast Landscapes

by Christine Tibbets

Generations of cowboys and ranchers, ropers and rodeos are not my normal circle of friends. That’s why I headed to Wyoming to meet some.

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See the U.S.A. with Warren

Western North Carolina

by Warren Resen
Photographs by Jeanne O'Conner

Summertime in Florida and the living is hot. We decided to head to the mountains of Western North Carolina for a month of cooler temperatures and sightseeing, something retired Floridians have been doing for years.   

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Vagabond Traveler

Travels to Research a Civil War Book

by Mary Emma Allen

Assisting my Cousin Steve in researching a book about our Civil War ancestor, Henry Ira Banks, has been a fascinating journey.  The book, The Legacy Road by Steve Enyeart, recently was released.  By combining our research and his travels, Steve has written a very informative blog and book about our ancestor and the Civil War era.   

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The Summer 2015 Edition of American Roads Magazine  

 

 

Adirondack Trail Mix  

The Wild Center

By Persis Granger

The Wild Center in Tupper Lake, NY, is a natural history museum. Or a park. Or a farmers’ market or art studio. Or an environmental awareness center. Or a sustainability training ground. Or a concert venue, or an Adirondack appreciation center, or….  Actually, The Wild Center is all of the above, and more, all with one theme binding the various facets together – an “enduring passion for the Adirondacks.” What it isn’t is a theme park with characters and rides and such. The Wild Center is the real deal – kids and adults exploring and interacting with the natural environment of the Adirondacks.

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Agri Lanes

The Old Fashioned Way: Homestead Heritage

by Kathleen Walls

Our pioneer ancestors survived and thrived in an untamed land. They did so because they were not dependant on anyone else. They grew their own food, made their own furniture and household items and learned to use what nature provided.

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Art Trails

Grounds for Sculpture

by Anne Jenkins

The tactile nature of sculpture as an art form can be good and bad. The forms are an invitation to touch and feel. Soft voluptuous curves or hard jagged edges provoke different images and emotions. Unfortunately, as recent attacks of vandalism in Italian museums have shown, not everyone touches and feels for the love of art or to understand it. But there are some sculptures that invite you in, encourage you to explore what the artist is saying and can improve the understanding of art, especially for children. And this is the strength of Grounds for Sculpture near Trenton, N.J.

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Chuckwagon Roundup

Recognizing Creme Brulee

by Kathleen Walls

Did you know July 27 is National Crème Brûlée Day? The origins of this sweet treat are believed to be English in spite of the French name.  Although the English referred to this mouth watering custard as "burnt cream," the name Crème Brûlée just sounds so much more delicious?

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Civil Rights Trails

Art of  Clementine Hunter

by Kathleen Walls

The Northwest Louisiana History Museum explores the unique cultural traditions from early native-American civilizations to the present. The building itself, designed by Trahan Architects, has won international acclaim for its design and is shared with the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame. However, even though both of the museums offer a multitude of interesting exhibits, there is one that is unique in that it tells the story of ordinary African Americans during the post slavery period in the South. Their story is told not in words but in images and it is told by an extraordinary woman.

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Civil War Trails


Visiting Louisiana's Civil War Hotspots

by Kathleen Walls

The importance of Louisiana in the War between the States is often overlooked. Since New Orleans controlled the mouth of the Mississippi River it was of vital strategic importance to both sides. Union Captain David Farragut succeeded in passing Confederate-held Fort Jackson and Fort St. Philip at the mouth of the Mississippi leaving New Orleans wide open to attack. The city had no choice. They surrendered on April 28, 1862. Both Fort Jackson and Fort St. Philip are not open to the public any longer. For the traveler interested in following the Civil War Trail there are a lot of places you want to visit in Louisiana.

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Elite Street Eats  

Kitchen on San Marco

By Kathleen Walls

Jacksonville, Florida has many great eating places so for a new restaurant to raise the standard, it has to be really special. The Kitchen on San Marco does just that. It opened in April 2015 and has been thrilling gourmets and casual diners alike since. A friend and I attended a pre-opening dinner there and were impressed with the quality of food and service.

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Exploring with Eleanor  

TOP TEN TIPS FOR A WILD WEST ROADTRIP
Drive through Western Nebraska

By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel 

The Wild West began in Nebraska. (Who knew?) The Oregon Trail, Mormon Trail, Pony Express, pioneers, trappers, explorers, Indian fighters and others heading west moved through Nebraska. Charles Kuralt, the late host of CBS’ Sunday Morning program, called Nebraska Highway 2, that runs east and west, “…one of America’s most beautiful highways.”  With an endorsement like that, it’s time for you to rev up your engine and head to the Cornhusker State.

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Fork in The Road  

The Big Texan or Bust

By Kathleen Walls

It's fun and food wrapped in one gaudy package. If Miss Kitty had a dinner date with Marshal Dillon, The Big Texan Steak Ranch in Amarillo is where they would dine.

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Happy Trails

Cornwall Iron Furnace

By Tom Straka
Photographs by Douglas H. Page, Jr.

The ironmaking industry had an important role in America’s technological and industrial development. It was one of the country’s earliest industries. There are many remnants of iron furnaces scattered around the country; most are just languishing stonework, but a few have been preserved as examples of a fascinating industry.

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Historic Trails

Louisiana's Rural Heritage

By Kathleen Walls

Imagine stepping back in time to a rural lifestyle of the 19th and early 20th century in the heart of Baton Rouge. Hard to believe but it's true. I did it when I visited the Rural Life Museum. This is life the way it was in Louisiana.

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Inn Roads

Bourbon Orleans: Hotel with a History

By Kathleen Walls

Of all the historic hotels in New Orleans,  Bourbon Orleans is perhaps the most interesting. It has a unique history and a few spirits of the past that still remain. I had the pleasure of staying there on a press trip for Travel South recently and so enjoyed the décor, atmosphere and comfort. The hotel is conveniently located on Orleans St. between Bourbon and Royal.

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Museum Stroll

B. B. King: Gone But Never Forgotten

By Kathleen Walls

The Blues might be considered the soul of American music. It was born in the dark soil of the Mississippi Delta and came of age at juke joints and small bars  where the field hands by day, musician by night preformed. It grew to adulthood in an era where a African American musician could entertain white patrons but nor sit in the same bar with them after a performance. It was more than a style of music. It was a cry for justice and a part of each singer's soul. If one man could be said to have brought this genera to the world's attention, that man is B. B. King.

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Music Row

Birth of American Music

By Kathleen Walls

The music of America was born in the Mississippi Delta. It was firmly rooted in the alluvial topsoil that the "Father of Waters" spewed across the land as it regularly overflowed its banks wreaking havoc on anything in its path. After mankind learned to tame the mighty river with levees, they realized the bounty the rampaging Mississippi had given them.  This land is one of the richest agricultural areas in the world. Almost anything will grow here; cotton, soybeans, corn and vegetables of almost any kind. Once upon a time, in the not too distant past, the Mississippi Delta ran on a system where the richest people in the country owned the land and the crops and some of the poorest worked the fields to produce their bounty. In that era, cotton was king. But this system produced one other important product, American music.

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Off the Beaten Path

McAllen: A Different Kind of Texas

by Kathleen Walls

When people think of Texas usually the first images are cowboys and rodeos. McAllen and all of Hidalgo County is a different  kind of Texas. It's filled with subtropical beauty and natural attractions but in recent years it has developed into a vibrant sophisticated city.

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On the Road with Grandma

Perusing Tucson’s Past

by Roberta Sandler

Taking my grandchildren on trips teaches them about the world around them while reinforcing the loving bond we share. They’ve heard enough about 19th-century Indian uprisings, outlaws and shootouts to know that there once was an untamed Old West, but I wanted to show them the actual remnants and symbols of our country’s long-gone Wild West. That’s how Alyssa, Samantha, Andrew and I ended up on the road to Tucson. (It was easy. They live in Phoenix and I was visiting them.)

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Potluck

Wild Bounty of Spring

 By Mary Emma Allen

With the coming of warmer weather, the greens growing wild add appeal to your meals. Many of these today are available in the supermarkets when you can't find them in the wild around your home, as we did when I grew up on the farm.
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Renee's Route

Cambridge, Maryland: Heart of the Eastern Shore

by Renee S. Gordon

From the first European sighting of the Chesapeake Bay area, believed to have been Spanish explorers in the 1520s, the region was lauded for its beauty and abundance of wildlife and fish. Mid-16th century maps show that they called the bay Santa Maria. The earliest documented foreign visitor, Captain John Smith, arrived 82-years later and it is from his journals that we gather information on the geography, native population and culture. The Native Americans referred to the water as the “great shellfish bay,”  "Tschiswapeki," which to English ears became Chesapeake. The major tribes in the region were the Nantaquak (Nanticoke), Pocomoke-Assateague and Susquehannock. You can follow the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail.

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Tibs Trails and Tastes

Nebraska Pioneer Trails

by Christine Tibbets

  Sandhill cranes can’t be wrong, not if 80 percent of the half million of them swoop in to central Nebraska’s Central Platte River Valley to catch their breath before continuing what Jane Goodall calls one of the world’s ten most splendid migrations.  

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Traditional Trail

A Tale of Two Sodas

 by Kathleen Walls

While Coca Cola and Dr Pepper have a lot of things in common; both were created by pharmacists, both were developed in the South just about a year apart and both were developed as a soda fountain drink, they each have a unique history.

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Scenic Roads

The Grand Canyon of Texas

 by Kathleen Walls

Want to explore the most beautiful spot in Texas? Look no farther than Palo Duro Canyon. As we drove the perfectly flat lands from Amarillo to the canyon I found it hard to believe there could be any drastic change in elevations. Boy was I wrong.

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Street Party


Juke Joint Festival

 by Kathleen Walls

Step out anywhere in downtown Clarksdale during the Juke Joint Festival and you will have a bounce to your step and a  swing to your walk. You can't help but feel the music. The music is in the air. Better still it's at every street corner and under ever store awning. This is not canned. It's for real and it's coming at you loud and strong.   Bands of every gender and ethnic mixture and every age group are playing straight from their heart. This is the sounds that make the Mississippi Delta so special. It's the Blues.

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See the U.S.A. with Warren

Georgia's Historic Antebellum Trail

by Warren Resen
Photographs by Jeanne O'Conner

Which would you think generates more passion in Georgia, the University of Georgia’s football team or the Civil War?  It’s probably a tossup up depending on the time of year and one’s ancestry.

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Vagabond Traveler

Seagrass and Simple Pleasures

by Mary Emma Allen

Whether you're traveling long distance or only on local jaunts, take a child exploring.  Enhance you knowledge and stretch your imagination as you look at the world through their eyes.

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Wet Roads

Cajun Pride Swamp Tour

By Kathleen Walls

Oh what fun to glide down a shady bayou and watch the alligators swimming around your boat. Alligators? Fun? And what about snakes? Not so sure of that? Well if you are gliding down that bayou with  Captain Tom Billiot on his Cajun Pride Swamp Tour you can relax and enjoy the wildlife. Even those huge alligators are fun to watch.

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Wild Roads

Cameron Park Zoo: The Happiest Surprise in Texas

By Kathleen Walls

Cameron Park Zoo bills itself as "The Happiest Surprise in Texas." That is so true, Not only for you the visitor but for the animals living there. Cameron Park Zoo is the direct opposite of that old time zoo with cramped cages and restless bored animals who paced back and forth in their tiny spaces. No indeed! At this zoo, the animals are the first consideration and that makes it a much more interesting place to visit. There is an enrichment program for all the animals.

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Spring 2015 Issue

 

Adirondack Trail Mix  

A Visit to Nettle Meadow Farm

By Persis Granger

Nettle Meadow Farm and Cheese Company is not the kind of place you’d be likely to stumble upon while headed to some other destination. Visitors to this Adirondack goat and sheep dairy arrive at the complex of red barns and barnyards by design, driven by the desire to see for themselves the place that produces the wide variety of artisan cheeses they love, and to take home some farm-fresh cheese.

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Agri Lanes

Farmtastic

by Kathleen Walls

One of Georgia’s best kept secrets is the Georgia Museum of Agriculture and Historic Village at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College. It’s easy to find located just off Interstate 75 in Tifton, Georgia and is a real treasure. Yet it isn’t as universally known as many tourist hotspots. This was my second visit there and it was never crowded. Considering all it has to offer, I don’t know why it isn't thronged with visitors.

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Art Trails

The Culinary Arts - How about a Food Tour?

by Anne Jenkins

Food occupies a lot of our time - we grow it, we plan meals, we shop for it, we experiment with it and it sustains us. When traveling we savor new culinary delights. And now food tourism is big business. Cooking schools all over the world vie for attention.

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Chuckwagon Roundup

  Breakfast Specials

by Kathleen Walls

Here are a few of my latest finds for out-of-this-world breakfasts.

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Civil Rights Trails

Booker T. Washington: An Under Rated Hero


by Kathleen Walls

History seldom cites Booker T. Washington as a Civil Rights Leader. In reality, he was one of the first and one of the most important African American leaders in the struggle of a former enslaved people to gain equality promised them under the law.

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Civil War Trails

Kennesaw Mountain to Nash Farms
A War Between the States Adventure


by William A. Bowers, Jr.

A visitor to the Atlanta, Georgia area that has an interest in the War Between the States era could not find a better place to visit and explore. So much that was pivotal in that war occurred around Atlanta and the eventual fall of that city paved the way for Sherman’s advance to the sea.

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Exploring with Eleanor  

Eating your way ‘round the world in Ann Arbor

By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel 

Located just 42 miles from Detroit, upscale Ann Arbor, Michigan refutes the small town stereotype. With a population of about 114,000, its sophistication comes as a surprise, and may be explained by being the home of the University of Michigan. It overflows with fine art museums and galleries, unique shopping and an outstanding culinary scene. For example, there are almost 300 restaurants, many headed by award-winning chefs, and the number of excellent ethnic restaurants boggles the mind.

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Fork in The Road  

Doggone Good: Chateau Morrrisette

By Kathleen Walls

I think Julia Child would have loved this winery and its restaurant. You might expect a winery to serve excellent wines but when a winery is the place to go for fine dining as well, now that’s something special.

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Happy Trails

Abraham Lincoln: “There I Grew Up…”

By Tom Straka
Photographs by Pat Straka

Abraham Lincoln brings the state of Illinois to mind, or maybe Kentucky, where he was born, but a quarter of Lincoln’s life was spent in a third state.  When he was seven years of age his father, Thomas, moved the family (Including mother, Nancy, and sister, Sarah) from Kentucky to the frontiers of southern Indiana.  Abraham Lincoln spent fourteen years of his life there from 1816 to 1830, when he moved to Illinois.  Those were his formative years, where he developed his morals and character.  The family claimed 160 acres near Little Pigeon Creek in what would become Spencer County, Indiana. Indiana became a state just about the same time as the family moved.  Lincoln referred to the unsettled woodlands as the “wild region.” 

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Historic Trails

On the Trail of the Pony Express

By Kathleen Walls

Legends of the Pony Express are part of our history. The Hollywood version is of hard riding steely eyed men blazing an trail across the American West. In the movie version they usually have countless adventures, fight off Indians, and find romance along the way. In truth, the reality is greater than the legend. In spite of the Hollywood version of the hunky hero, the riders were all in their teens and weighed less than 125 pounds in most cases. the company preferred orphans for obvious reasons.

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Inn Roads

The Chattanooga Choo Choo

By Kathleen Walls

“A private railcar is not an acquired taste. One takes to it immediately..” Eleanor Robson Belmont-Actress and founder of the Metropolitan Opera Guild

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Museum Stroll

Then and Now: The Georgia Rural Telephone Museum

By Kathleen Walls

Where would we be without our phone? It’s our protection should our car break down. It’s how we plan our lives and communicate with friends. We use it to do business. Isn’t it wonderful that it fits in our pocket or purse and goes wherever we do? Little did I dream back in the day when I watched Star Trek’s Captain Kirk “call” Mr. Spock on that nifty little handheld device that I would one day have my own and not leave home without it.

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Native Trails

Alphabet 101

by Kathleen Walls

In the history of humanity only one man ever created an alphabet single handedly. He was a poor silversmith who went by the American name of George Gist or Guest. Today, he is known to the world as Sequoyah.

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Rail Roads

The Romance of the Rail

 by Kathleen Walls

For over a century America has carried on a love affair with the steam locomotive. It still represents the romance of the train. Watch one of the epic old movies and you will be awed by the power of the old steam engine pulling into the station puffing a cloud of smoke above it.

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Renee's Route

Fredericksburg, VA, Step into History (1800-1870)

by Renee S. Gordon

Fredericksburg has always benefitted from a location that placed it at the heart of all of the events that contributed to the making of America. It thrived as an inland port, was an early urban center and served as a gateway to westward expansion. The institution of slavery was interwoven in every event and activity and by the onset of the Civil War the population consisted of approximately 50% people of African descent with 1,200 slaves, 350 free blacks and 3,000 whites. An African American male in his prime sold for about $1500, $40,000 in modern currency.

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Tibs Trails and Tastes

Discover North Carolina’s Yadkin Valley for Wines and Other Delights

by Christine Tibbets

 Winemakers who understand the science of the land and the grapes are recognizing similarities to France’s Burgundy region in North Carolina, close to the border with Virginia.

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See the U.S.A. with Warren

New Orleans

by Warren Resen
Photographs by Jeanne O'Conner

The “Big Easy,” was an eagerly awaited stop on our road trip. It was a city we had never before visited and were looking forward to the sights and sounds of this storied place.

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Wet Roads

Chattanooga Drifting

By Kathleen Walls

Some attractions are hectic, fast paced and exciting. Fun maybe but not really relaxing. If you are looking for relaxing fun in Chattanooga there is one special place that offers the best of both worlds. It is exciting and fun but it also offers a perfect way to spend a relaxing day.

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Wild Roads

Georgia’s Seven Natural Wonders

By Kathleen Walls

Everyone has heard of the seven natural wonders of the world. In 1999, they have been challenged by a group promoting the New Seven Wonders. However, Georgia has had its own Seven Wonders since state librarian Ella May Thornton, published her list in the Atlanta Georgian Magazine on December 26, 1926. It has since been amended but the present Seven Wonders of Georgia are well worth a trip across the state to view each and every one.

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The Winter 2015 Edition of American Roads Magazine  

 


You will always find interesting lodging here at American Roads. Remember when planning a vacation or business trip, it's always a good idea to research the available lodging. The last thing you want is an unpleasant surprise when you arrive at your destination. My favorite way to check with a reliable service that gives me ratings, reviews, lots of photos and the ability to book through whichever booking agency is currently offering the lowest price. All through the same website. You can do the same.  Click here for the best way to find a hotel worldwide.

Lagniappe (Our new E-zine branches off from this page)

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Adirondack Trail Mix  

The Glen Lodge and Wild Waters Outdoor Center

By Persis Granger

Travelers to the Adirondack find a wide range of lodging choices, from nationally known chain motels, to posh hotels, or, for those who like the more homey, friendly touch, bed and breakfasts. B & Bs abound in the region, nestled in the woods, along creeks or on hilltops. Each has its own character and special allure. Each has a unique story of how it was started, and of the people who poured their dreams into it.

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Agri Lanes

The Farmer in the Big Easy

by Kathleen Walls

New Orleans is famous for many thing but until recent years agriculture was not one of them. That is changing. Since Katrina, community gardens have become a part of the Big Easy. Food has always been an important part of New Orleans culture but a disaster like Katrina reminded people how fragile the link that connects us with the far away markets. I recalled the scene in "Gone With the Wind" where Scarlett returns home to the ruined fields of Tata and grubs in the garden to find a few tough greens that survived the devastation. She pulls up a handful and holds them to heaven and cries "As God is my witness, they're not going to lick me. I'm going to live through this and when it's all over, I'll never be hungry again."

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Art Trails

Intriguing Ponce and Puerto Rico

by Anne Jenkins

As the colder weather settles in, Puerto Rico's hot  weather, warm people and good art sounds very inviting. Once you arrive in San Juan, rent a car and drive straight out of town to the Southern shore of the island and get settled in Ponce before exploring. There's nothing wrong with San Juan, you can spend a couple of days there before you leave. It's the big city, so to get a taste of the real Puerto Rico head on out of town and prepare to be delighted.

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Artisan Trails

Made in Southeast Tennessee  

by Kathleen Walls

 In a time when so much that we buy has a label reading "Made in China" it's refreshing to visit a state with a "Made in Tennessee" travel campaign. If you enjoy watching talented crafters create useful, artistic or edible products, Tennessee fills the bill.

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Chuckwagon Roundup

Dining  Cajun Style  

by Kathleen Walls

As my favorite Cajun cook, Justin Wilson,  once said "There`s no place in the whole world that has food as good as us Cajuns down in South Louisiana."

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Civil Rights Trails

Lorraine Motel: Death Brings Forth New Life

by Kathleen Walls

Sometimes, new life springs forth from death. For years the very name Lorraine Motel conjured up images of hatred and bigotry. The events of April 4, 1968 link Lorraine Motel forever with the assassination of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. Today, the old motel tells a different story. It has metamorphosed into the National Civil Rights Museum. The former boarding house where James Earl Ray stayed and from where he fired the fatal shot is now the Legacy Building. The entrance is a timeline up until Dr. King's assassination and provides a detailed timeline of the movements of both Dr. King and James Earl Ray in the days leading up to the assassination until Ray's capture.

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Cowboy Trails

Scout's Rest

by Kathleen Walls

Western historians generally  agree that the most recognizable celebrity on Earth at the turn of the 20th century was Buffalo Bill Cody. His larger-than-life career linked two centuries. He was born in Iowa Territory in February 26, 1846  and died in Denver. Colorado on January 10, 1917 He was the stereotype of the wild west: Indian scout, buffalo hunter, gold prospector, Civil War soldier, pony express rider, rancher: William Fredrick Cody was that and more. He  also was many of the things that we think of as "20th century ": his career included Congressional Medal of Honor recipient, showman, entrepreneur, town founder, owner of a dude ranch and big game hunting preserve and even environmentalist.

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Exploring with Eleanor  

Top 10 Reasons “Foxes” Get Away to the Fox Cities

By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel 

We all know that attractive, fabulous women are known as “foxes.” But did you know that the Fox Cities of Appleton, Menasha and Neenah in eastern Wisconsin are the favorite destinations for a Midwest Girlfriends Getaway? Why? Because they offer what gal pals love.

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Fork in The Road  

Great Western Dining in the Heart of the South

By Kathleen Walls

You don't have to travel out west for some great western dining. I recently visited Bald Headed Bistro in Cleveland, Tennessee and found the best of the west right there. I felt like I had arrived at a plush lodge in Jackson Hole.  That could be because the signage and lighting  that greet you as you step inside the door was designed by award-winning Jackson Hole artist John Mortensen. The booths, furnishings and décor are an artistic blend of hand crafted woods, hides, and leather done by Rocky Mountain artisans. The light fixtures are showplace quality. Throughout there are unique touches like mounted wildlife on the walls, 55 million year old fossils are embedded in the walls and floor. The doors feature an "etched" snow elk that was created using "electrochemical etching."

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Happy Trails

In Concrete Wonderland

By Tom Straka
Photographs by Pat Straka

A good roadside attraction will usually draw us in; the more unusual the better.  And the Wisconsin Concrete Park is highly unusual, even by our standards. If you are from Wisconsin, you’ll know what I mean when I say it looks like it was hijacked from the Wisconsin Dells.  It is artsy enough for a museum, while still being gaudy enough for the Dells, and with enough history and folklore to be fascinating at the same time. It is easy to get to, if you happen to be in the middle of Wisconsin’s Northwoods; it is located only a half-mile south of Phillips, the county seat of Price County.  It definitely will not be a problem noticing it on the left side of the road if you head south on state road 13 

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Historic Trails

Battle of New Orleans

By Kathleen Walls

Who hasn't tapped their toes to Johnny Horton's "Battle of New Orleans?" Realistically, the actual battle occurred on the outskirts of New Orleans in Chalmette, Louisiana 200 years ago, January 8, 1815. There had been several earlier battles and skirmishes where the British tried to take New Orleans but none were decisive. Not until The British army led by General Edward Pakingham tangled with General Andrew Jackson's ragtag army at what is now known as Pakingham Oaks, so named for the majestic oaks there and the attacking general.

                                                                                                        read historical_trails_winter2015.htm

Inn Roads

Ashton's Bed and Breakfast

By Kathleen Walls

When visiting a city with the history and heritage of New Orleans it's important to pick a lodging that fits your needs and mirrors the city's personality. I stayed at Ashton's for a short trip before I went to Lake Charles for Travel Media Showcase this year. As a travel writer, I have stayed in lots of great places but Ashton's ranks up near the top of my list. It is gracious old New Orleans at its best.

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Literary Trails

Visit an Author in the Big Easy

By Kathleen Walls

No  city in the South has had such an impact on the literary figures that molded the twentieth century as New Orleans.  Next time you visit New Orleans, take yourself on a "Writer's Tour"  and visit some of the places made famous by the greatest literary minds of their time.

 

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Mountain Roads

Blue Ridge Scenic Byway in Virginia

By Kathleen Walls

The Blue Ridge Parkway is 469 miles of mountain beauty connecting Shenandoah National Park and the Skyline Drive in Virginia, with the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee.  

                                                                                                               read Mountain Roads- Click Here

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Museum Stroll

Mardi Gras World

By Kathleen Walls

Say "Mardi Gras" and everyone thinks of New Orleans, parties and fun. Not many people think of the work and effort it takes to put on a world class spectacular event each year. One place represents that year round part of Mardi Gras more than any other in the world, Blaine Kern's Mardi Gras World. This is where you can see Mardi Gras in action year round.  Since 1947, Blaine Kern Studios has built those stunning parade floats for Mardi Gras and lots of other events as well.

                                                                                           read Museum Stroll- Click Here

Native Trails

Visiting the Chitimacha: Louisiana's Native People

by Kathleen Walls

Few native Americans managed to retain their ancestral lands so when I visited the Chitimacha Museum in Charenton, Louisiana and found that the Chitimacha still retained some of their original homelands in Louisiana, I was intrigued and wanted to learn more about these little known people. Tahra Demarco, Museum Services Specialist, led us through the museum and was willing to tell us about her people.

                                                                    read Native Trails- Click Here

Off the Beaten Path

Hard Work University

by Kathleen Walls

College of the Ozarks, gives a whole new meaning to "working your way through college." The college is also known as "Hard Work U" because of its work instead of pay policy. Students work at places that are part of the campus to earn tuition and room and board. The unique structure of the institute make it a wonderful destination as well as a place to learn. The college has its own inn, restaurant, gristmill, farmer's market, museums and other places of interest you can enjoy touring. The 1,000 acre campus overlooks Lake Taneycomo at Point Lookout, Missouri. Most of the attractions are free of charge and all are staffed and operated with student labor.

                                                                                          read Off the Beaten Path- Click Here

 

Potluck

Blizzard Weather, Cooking Weather

 By Mary Emma Allen

Cold, snowy weather, "blizzard weather, "often mean delicious aromas in the kitchen when we came inside from snow clearing tasks, skiing, and sledding.  This might be a lunch, snacks, or cocoa and goodies as you warm before the stove or fireplace.
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Renee's Route

Deep into Detroit

by Renee S. Gordon

The first multi-million dollar industry in the New World was the fur trade and as early as 1608 Champlain began to form alliances with Indians to trade furs to Europe and in 1682 La Salle claimed for France all the land drained by the Mississippi and its tributaries. All of the early American settlements were established in locations based on their proximity to transportation to facilitate trade. Waterways and native trails were the first highways and no region had better access than that of an area in Michigan Territory. Lake St. Clair flows into Lake Erie there and the French traders referred to it as “the Strait,” or “Le Detroit.”

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Traditional Trails

Little City with a Big Heart:
The Story of North Platte Canteen

 by Kathleen Walls

“What happened in North Platte is a miracle. It was a love story between a country and its sons.” This is how Bob Greene, author of Once Upon a Town, a book about the North Platte Canteen, sums up what the canteen accomplished. The North Platte Canteen is one of America's little known World War II stories. I first heard of it on a recent visit to North Platte. You  know you are going to have an authentic experience when you enter the museum through three doors that are preserved from the original North Platte Canteen. Inside, we were greeted  by James Griffin, the museum curator.

 

                                                                                                 read Traditional Trails click here

 

Tibs Trails and Tastes

Choose four Colorado towns to access Rocky Mountain National Park

by Christine Tibbets

Time to change that old notion about all roads leading to Rome.  Update it to talk about all the roads leading to Rocky Mountain National Park.

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See the U.S.A. with Warren

AMELIA ISLAND  - 400 Years and 8 Flags

by Warren Resen
Photographs by Jeanne O'Conner

Florida’s AMELIA ISLAND, at 13 miles long and 2 miles wide, is approximately the same size as the Island of Manhattan. Over the course of its 400 years of modern history, Amelia Island has had eight different flags flown over it, some multiple times, as the major powers gained and lost their ascendency over the land.

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Vagabond Traveler

Journaling Your Travels

by Mary Emma Allen

Organizing your photos, postcards and other travel collectibles  can be enjoyable and enable you to relive your various trips.  Journal writing also adds to the  memories for you and other family members.  These are items you can pass along throughout the years as you share your adventures.

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War Trails

World War II Remembered

 by Kathleen Walls

The bombing of Pearl Harbor on  December 7, 1941, dubbed by President Roosevelt, "a day that will live in Infamy,"  created a sense of patriotism the United States unequaled ever since. Then on June 6, 1945 there occurred a day that will live in triumph.

 

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Wet Roads

High Plains Drifting: Kayaking and Tanking on Nebraska's Rivers

 by Kathleen Walls

If you hadn't thought of Nebraska as a great water sports destination think again. The rivers of Nebraska's Sandhills offer unique opportunities and some spectacular scenery. 

 

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Wild Trails

Louisiana's Wetlands: Wild and Wonderful

 by Kathleen Walls

Are you in search of exotic birds, elusive mammals and reptiles from the prehistoric era?  Do you think you need to travel to foreign lands to find such wildlife? No way! You can find all that in Louisiana's wild and wonderful swamps and wetlands. These are precious and endangered places. Each year they face more dangers from natural causes such as hurricanes and salt water incursion and even worse from human causes such as development and waste dumping. Visit them while that still exist in their primal states and do all you can to help to preserver these natural treasures.

 

                                                                                                            read Wild Trails click here

AMERICAN ROADS TRAVEL MAGAZINE

The Fall 2014 Edition of American Roads Magazine  

 


Lagniappe (Our new E-zine branches off from this page)

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Adirondack Trail Mix  

A Visit to Basil and Wicks, North Creek, NY

By Persis Granger

The original Basil and Wicks was in operation when we first moved to the Adirondacks in the mid-1970s.  I won’t be named “Mom of the Year” for saying this, but back then I thought of Basil and Wicks as a “family bar.” It was clean, well-managed and friendly. Basil – or was it Wick? – we never knew who it was behind the bar – ran a tight ship.

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Agri Lanes

It's Rocking at the Ranch

by Kathleen Walls

Things start rocking at the Ranch when Fall rolls around. That's Rock Ranch located in The Rock, Georgia.  On the off chance you never heard of "The Rock," it's a tiny hamlet about an hour south of Atlanta and worth every minute of the drive.

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Art Trails

Fall Studio Tours and Arts Markets

by Anne Jenkins

We are lucky indeed that art studio tours during fall are two a-penny and buyers are spoiled for choice in every region. I strongly  recommend you always support your local studio tours, but here are three of my top picks one in the nation's capital, one in the nation's most lively city and one in a tranquil rural area. All the websites are listed at the end of this article for more information.

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Chuckwagon Roundup

Family Tradition

by Kathleen Walls

As Hank Williams, Jr. says they are "just carrying on an old family tradition" and the food in these multi-generational restaurants makes that family proud. These restaurants are still operated by a family member of in one case passed on to a "like family" member

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Civil Rights Trails

From the Ashes

by Kathleen Walls

Like a Phoenix rising from the ashes, Resora in Albany, Georgia, is a story of love and compassion conquering the demons of hate and bigotry. What was once a place of enslavement now serves the multiple purposes of recreation, cultural awareness and empowerment.

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Civil War Trails

Shiloh: American's Waterloo

by Kathleen Walls

Captain, give me a gun – The blamed fight ain’t got no rear.” This was the conclusion of an unknown Ohio private who had tried to flee to safety during the Battle of Shiloh. He decided he had to stay and fight since he observed in this battle, there was no refuge to retreat into, no rear to hide a frightened man. The battle was everywhere at once.

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Dark Roads

New Orleans' Cities of the dead

by Kathleen Walls

In recent years cemeteries have become popular tourist destination. Some cities have instituted "Cemetery Walks." Others "Ghost Tours" in their burial grounds. Only in New Orleans is this not a new practice. The mysterious, historic and often haunted cemeteries of the Crescent City have always drawn visitors.

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Exploring with Eleanor  

HARRISBURG--Perfect for a weekend getaway

By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel 

Summer’s over, and everyone is back to school or work. But many of us are still experiencing that laid-back vibe, causing us to hunt for a perfect weekend escape. And why not? The weather is temperate, the leaves are brightly colored and lodging fees have dropped. Harrisburg, the capital of Pennsylvania, offers family activities, great restaurants, history, outdoor fun, wine trails and food and art events.

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Fork in The Road  

Sing for your Supper at Mel's Hard Luck Diner

By Kathleen Walls

Many a future singing star starts out as a waiter. Usually it's just a stopgap until their musical talent can land them in the spotlight.  It's only at  Mel's Hard Luck Diner, the home of Branson's Original Singing Servers, that singers aspire to become servers.

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Happy Trails

Cave-In-Rock

By Tom Straka
Photographs by Pat Straka

We tend to drive alternatives to the interstate when the opportunity arises.  One of our favorite alternatives involves a free ferry ride across the Ohio River, a grand cave, and a history of river pirates.

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Historic Trails

Fort Robinson: Bridging Three Centuries

By Kathleen Walls

Fort Robinson is one of those rare places where history, culture and nature intersect. It's a place where old or young, casual vacationer or serious student, could all have a great time and come away with totally different impressions. 

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Inn Roads

The Peabody: It's Just Ducky

By Kathleen Walls

The Peabody Hotel in Memphis is a tradition. Its daily "Duck Walk" is world famous and draws both local and international a visitors.

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Literary Trails

The Roots of "Roots"

By Kathleen Walls

 In 1976, a literary bombshell bust upon American literature.  It was a book that fit its times. After the Civil Rights movement of the 60s, African Americans were looking at their culture and background with a new and different eye. "Black Pride"  was the watchword of the time. Roots: The Saga of an American Family  by Alex Haley erupted upon  the American consciousness at exactly the right moment. 

 

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Museum Stroll

Museums of New Orleans

By Kathleen Walls

New Orleans is filled with museums. Some have been there for time immemorial. Others pop up as interest in their special subject grows. This is just a small sampling of what New Orleans has to offer.

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---------- Music Row

Bred in the Soul

Article and photos by Kathleen Walls

In Tennessee, music is bred deep in the soul. You will find it anywhere. You might stop at the West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center in Brownsville just for a break as you travel along the Tennessee Music Highway. You might think it's a visitor center.  It is. It is also so much more.

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Native Trails

Culture of the Mound Builders

Article and photos by Kathleen Walls

About 1,000 years before the ancient Egyptians built the pyramids, native people of North American were busy building huge ceremonial and burial mounds.  

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Pioneer Path

Westward Ho: Western Nebraska's Pioneer Trails

Article and photos by Kathleen Walls

In May 1848 Sam Brannan, a storekeeper at Sutter's Creek,  strode onto the streets of San Francisco carrying a bottle filled with gold dust and announced his find. 'Gold! Gold! Gold from American River!'

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Potluck

Frost on the Pumpkins

 By Mary Emma Allen

."The frost is on the pumpkins" was a phrase of my childhood, from a poem Mother quoted us.  "And a chill is in the air," she'd continue.
.

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Rail Roads

Nebraska's Golden Spike

Article and photos by Kathleen Walls

When I stepped out on the  eighth story glass enclosed viewing platform of the Golden Spike Tower I was met with a panoramic view of Union Pacific’s Bailey Yard, a sight to thrill all rail fans and even semi-rail fans like myself. As I strolled around the tower, I had a 360 degree view of Bailey Yard and the Platte River Valley. I decided to take a quick elevator ride down one floor to see how the seventh floor open-air platform differed. The view was much the  same from the two observation decks but the lower one was windy and cooler.

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Renee's Route

The Adirondacks, “Sanctuary of Dreams”

by Renee S. Gordon

New York’s Adirondacks State Park is a magnificent gem of extremely underrated value. The 6-million acre park, larger than Glacier Park, the bold Grand Canyon, Great Smoky Mountains,Yellowstone.Yosemite all put together, includes 8,000-sq. miles of mountains, 1,500-miles of rivers, 30,000-miles of streams, 2,000-miles of foot trails and more than 2,300 lakes. It is also home to 66 fish species, and greater than 50 animal and 220 bird species. It is an all season destination and visitors can engage in every activity from Olympic level skiing to fall foliage viewing.

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  Road Dog

Baron Does New Orleans

by Baron Byrd (with assistance from Veronica Byrd)

My human really did it this time she took me to one of the most entertaining places in the world.  New Orleans, yes The Big Easy.  I saw and did things that I cannot imagine humans actually do and actually get away with it.

 

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Scenic Roads

Wildflowers of  Western Nebraska

 by Kathleen Walls

One of the most striking things you notice as you wander trails and paths in western Nebraska along what was once the Oregon Trail is the stunning array of wildflowers. They are blooming in the harshest most inhospitable soil you can imagine yet are flourishing and adding a patchwork of color to the high plains.

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Street Party

Silver Dollar City goes Red, White and Blue

Article and photos by Kathleen Walls

Calling  Silver Dollar City "a theme park" is only half the story. Think theme park and you envision rides and attractions with some short-order fast food thrown in. Silver Dollar City is more a celebration of 19th century Ozark Mountain Americana. It's a mini-village filled with artisans, unique shops, shows, dining of all kinds, buildings you would find in an19th century  Ozark village.  

.

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Traditional Trails

Castles in Arcadiana

Article and photos by Kathleen Walls

"A man's home is his castle" is the old saying. This is ever so true in Houma, Louisiana and along the Cajun Coast. As you cruise the area, you find countless mansions that elicit memories of an earlier era. In the 19th century sugar, not cotton, was king here. Many a man made a fortune and built a luxurious mansion to display his wealth. Here are a few I visited recently.

 

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Tibs Trails and Tastes

Reinvigorate Your Landscape Memories In Western Nebraska

by Christine Tibbets

  Maybe you can discover all of western Nebraska’s treasures with global positioning devices on a vacation road trip, but I’d recommend conjuring up an ancient skill too: landscape memory.

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See the U.S.A. with Warren

A World Apart …Door County, Wisconsin

by Warren Resen
Photographs by Jeanne O'Conner

Jutting out from Green Bay into Lake Michigan, Wisconsin’s Door County is a peninsula that is a world apart and a visitor’s delight. Visiting Door County is like having a picture postcard come to life.

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Vagabond Traveler

Autumn Time, Apple Time

by Mary Emma Allen

When I was substitute teaching in art class the other day, the second grade teacher walked by with a large pan. "Would you like some apple crisp?" she asked. 

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The Summer 2014 Edition of American Roads Magazine  

 

American Roads is proud to present the Summer 2014  Edition of American Roads Magazine.                  

Lagniappe (Our new E-zine branches off from this page)

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Adirondack Trail Mix  

A Visit to Natural Stone Bridge and Caves

By Persis Granger

“Char-lie, wait for meeee!” The chipmunk-cheeked five-year-old had been left in his brother’s dust.

The slender eight-year-old with wispy white-blond hair, paused farther down the trail, tapped his toe and said, “Come on, Will. There’s a neat cave up here. I’m going inside!”

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Agri Lanes

Perfect 10

by Kathleen Walls

"Oh give me a home where the buffalo roam…“ The words of this old song are familiar to Americans of a certain age from the era of the western movies. The buffalo are symbolic of our American West. Once they roamed the plains in vast numbers. Then around the turn of the 20th century hunters and "sportsmen" almost annihilated the great herds.

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Art Trails

Up, Down and Art in Detroit

by Anne Jenkins

I try hard not to prejudge cities or countries before traveling there. I have been to Detroit many times but not since it's spectacular collapse and I couldn't help wondering what I'd find, especially since the media are pretty harsh with most reports.

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Chuckwagon Roundup

Out of the Ordinary: Ethnic Restaurants

by Kathleen Walls

Eating is an adventure. Never hesitate to take a chance on something new. When traveling, we are often tempted to stick to the tried and true American food, hamburgers, hot dogs or fried chicken.  There are lots of other choices out there. Here are some unique ethnic restaurants I sampled recently.

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Civil Rights Trails

Georgia Crafts

by Kathleen Walls

Ellen Craft and Lucy Craft Laney, they had so much more in common than a shared name. But they probabaly never met. 

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Civil War Trails

Heart of the Confederacy: Augusta's Civilians

by Kathleen Walls

During the War between the States in the South, it was not only military actions that kept the Confederacy going. Factories that produced materials needed for the war effort were indispensible. Without  them the soldiers would have had not guns, ammunition, clothing or railroad transportation to keep them functioning.

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Exploring with Eleanor  

Arts Alive! In Ann Arbor, Michigan

By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel 

Small cities often surprise me with the unexpected. Ann Arbor left me with my mouth wide open in awe. Located a mere 43 miles west of Detroit, the college town has superseded the larger city in many of the fine arts.

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Fork in The Road  

Hop on Down to Frog Hollow Tavern

By Kathleen Walls

Cross Southern Hospitality and down home food with Big Apple chic and you get Frog Hollow Tavern.

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Happy Trails

Revolutionaly War Battlefields Kings Mountain and Cowpens

By Tom Straka
Photographs by Pat Straka

Two fascinating Revolutionary War Battlefields, both located just off Interstate 85, are often overlooked by drivers speeding towards one of those cities.

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Inn Roads

Augusta's Treasure: The Partridge Inn

By Kathleen Walls

No other hotel in Augusta can match the gracious Partridge Inn for history and ambiance. A stay at the historic inn offers the feel of visiting an Antebellum home. That might be because originally the Partridge Inn was just that. Despite the fact that the Partridge Inn didn't turn into a hotel until the 1900s, it does had an intriguing Civil War legend surrounding the gracious old hotel. Partridge Inn began life in 1816 as the two-story home of Daniel and Elizabeth Meigs. It was prior to before the home passed into public use that the event creating the legend is believed to have occurred.

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Museum Stroll

Frank Lloyd Wright's Masterpiece in Rockford

By Kathleen Walls

Rockford, Illinois has a new museum to brag about. It is something unusual, the newest Frank Lloyd Wright museum, The Kenneth and Phyllis Laurent House. This is the only building ever designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for a person with a disability. Wright personally considered this one of the 35 best works of his career. The museum just opened on Friday, June 6, 2014.

 read Museum Stroll- Click Here

Music Row

Happy Birthday Rock and Roll

Article and photos by Kathleen Walls

Many music  historians credit July 5, 1954 as the day Rock and Roll was born. It was on that day that a little know singer with an unbelievable smile and wiggly hips walked into Sun Studio in Memphis, Tennessee and recorded That's All Right Mama.

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Native Trails

Dancing Leaf

Article and photos by Kathleen Walls

Deep in Nebraska's Sandhills there is a special place that transports you to a time before written history when primitive people lived in harmony with nature.Discovery Park of America in Union City will rock your world. Literally. Experience an earthquake such as the ones that rocked this area of Northwest Tennessee 1811 and 1812 changing the terrain and creating a brand new waterway, Reelfoot Lake. The Earthquake Simulator is only one of the reasons you will want to visit Discovery Park.

.

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e

Off the Beaten Path

Discovery Park of American: See Beyond

Article and photos by Kathleen Walls

Discovery Park of America in Union City, Tennessee will rock your world. Literally. Experience an earthquake such as the ones that rocked this area of Northwest Tennessee 1811 and 1812 changing the terrain and creating a brand new waterway, Reelfoot Lake. The Earthquake Simulator is only one of the reasons you will want to visit Discovery Park.

.

 read Off the Beaten Path Click here

Off the Interstate

Branson: Something for Everyone

Article and photos by Kathleen Walls

Branson, Missouri is a town that's full of it. Yes, it's full of fun, food, music, entertsainment and just plain All American Values.

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Potluck

Gleaning Recipes from Relatives in Your Travels

 By Mary Emma Allen

In our travels, my family and I have always enjoyed discovering new recipes.  Some of these have come from relatives we've visited, whether on short or longer trips.  I've been organizing  some of these recipes for our family heritage.  You'll also recall family memories accompanying many of these recipes.
.

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Renee's Route

Indianapolis' Year of Family Travel

by Renee S. Gordon

The Archeological evidence of human habitation in the area that is now Indianapolis points to Native American presence circa 9500 BC.    Documentary evidence of tribal groups begins with journals kept during LaSalle’s 1679 explorations. At that time members of the Miami Confederacy lived in the region. On October 3, 1818 with the signing of the Treaty of St. Mary’s, Ohio the Miami relinquished 7,000,000-acres of land and retained 31,460-acres. They were allowed to live on reservations on their land and the tribe received a yearly annuity of $15,000. Almost immediately settlers began to move into the area.

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  Road Dog

Silver Springs State Park

by Baron Byrd (with assistance from Veronica Byrd)

It is now time to go on my first official camping trip.  I suggested to my human companion to load up the car and her bike so that I may seek the adventures of the wild life.  She gladly approved. We headed to Silver Springs State Park, Florida.

 

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Tibs Trails and Tastes

South Carolina Low Country Charms Abound in Beaufort

by Christine Tibbets

Simply show up in Beaufort South Carolina and the living is easy. Walkable. Tasty.Up-close architectural wonders and broad-vista costal views.

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See the U.S.A. with Warren

A Brief Tour of St. Augustine 500 Years after Ponce de Leon.

by Warren Resen
Photographs by Jeanne O'Conner

March 15, 1513 is the date recorded for Ponce de Leon's landing on the coast of eastern  Florida.  A ship's log book records land being sighted at what he probabaly though was an island at 30 degrees 8 minutes North Latitude which is about 10 miles north of the present day St. Augustine. The year 2013 marked the 500th year of this monumentus event and festivities continue into early 2014.

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Wild Roads

Get Swamp Fever: Visit Phinizy Swamp Nature Park

by Kathleen Walls

As Georgia's second largest city, you may not have considered Augusta as a nature lover's paradise. Well, think again. On a recent trip to Augusta, I discovered one of the city's best kept secrets. Phinizy Swamp Nature Park.

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Vagabond Traveler

Traveling Through Yesterday

by Mary Emma Allen

My father stimulated my interest in the history of this country by taking us to historic sites when we traveled.  Mother researched them with her school teacher's instincts and pulled out maps and pictures.

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The Spring 2014 Edition of American Roads Magazine  

 


 

Adirondack Trail Mix  

A Jaunt to the Adirondack Museum

By Persis Granger

Are you the kind of traveler who likes to soak up the culture and history of the region you are visiting? If so, during your next North Country vacation, plan to spend a day at the Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake, NY.

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Agri Lanes

True Grits from Nora Mill

by Kathleen Walls

Many places in the Mountains of Appalachia have their own special magic. A visit there is like stepping back to a more peaceful time. Most places you visit and leave all their magic, except the memories and maybe a few pictures, behind when you return to the modern world.

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Art Trails

The Philadelphia Mural Story

by Anne Jenkins

Philadelphia lures you with thousands of murals, some large, some small. All of them amazing works of art. There's no way to see them all in a short space of time or even a whole day. There are good maps of them 

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Chuckwagon Roundup

On The Waterfront: My Favorite Waterfront Restaurants

by Kathleen Walls

What better place to dine than looking out over a water view. Some of my fondest memories are of some of my favorite waterfront places. Here are a few.

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Civil War Trails

Divided We Stand: The Civil War in West Virginia

by Kathleen Walls

While the War Between the States divided families and pitted brother against brother (see Hatfield  McCoy Feud) only one state is a direct result of the conflict that tore families, a nation and a state apart. West Virginia was born of that conflict and the labor pains were excruciating. 

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Exploring With Eleanor

Louisiana's Family Friendly Mardi Gras

By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel

Would I ever take my kids to Mardi Gras in New Orleans? No way! Not with women flashing boobs at every turn, and drunken revelers stumbling along the streets. But the time before Lent is important, and celebrated throughout the Christian world. It may be called Mardi Gras (French for Fat Tuesday), Carnevale or Carnival, but it represents the merriment that overflows the weeks before the somber 40 days of sacrifice and prayer of the Lenten season. So it was reassuring to discover Lake Charles, Louisiana, a city where families can enjoy the festive celebration with music, food, spangled costumes, parades and more.

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Fork in The Road  

Trabue: Doubly Delicious Dining

By Kathleen Walls

Trabue in Punta Gorda, Florida is where Paris, France meets Cracker Florida. Chef Keith Meyers creates a fascinating array of dishes where he combines the best of traditional French style cuisine with Florida's local offerings.

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Garden Paths  

Anderson Japanese Gardens: Paradise on Earth

By Kathleen Walls

What better place to be on a sunny spring day than in a fertile garden surrounded by luxuriant plants and bubbling brooks. One such magic location is Anderson Japanese Gardens in Rockford., Illinois. As you enter the garden. all your senses are rewarded. A fresh earthy fragrance mingles with the sounds of a small tumbling stream and multi-shades of green greet you. 

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Happy Trails

Cumberland Gap National Historic Park

By Tom Straka
Photographs by Pat Straka

The Appalachian Mountains extend for nearly 1,500 miles from Newfoundland in Canada to Central Alabama in the United States. They are really a series of mountain ranges with an average elevation of 3,000 feet, with some peaks exceeding 6,000 feet.  They were a natural barrier to westward expansion from America’s coastal plain to the boundless interior lowlands. Only a few gaps existed in the mountain range. One feature of the Appalachians is a series of interior lowland valleys that forms a “trough” that runs from Canada to Alabama, called the Great Appalachian Valley. That valley was a major transportation route for Native Americans and later for colonial settlers. The Great Wagon Road used this route to move settlers from Pennsylvania south.  The road began in Philadelphia, crossed the Potomac River at Harpers Ferry, and followed the Shenandoah Valley up to the town of Big Lick (Roanoke today).  At Roanoke the road split, one route into the Carolinas and ending in Augusta and the other route leading to the Wilderness Road.  

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Heritage Roads

Rockford Illinois's Swedish Heritage

By Kathleen Walls

Rockford, Illinois has the third largest concentration of Swedish people per capita in the United States. Erlander Museum in Rockford preserves Rockford's Swedish roots. It's named for John Erlander and his daughter Mary. The Englander family is typical of many Swedish immigrants to Rockford. John emigrated from Sweden to Chicago, Illinois and then Rockford. He worked as a tailor and later opened a furniture store in partnership with other Swedish men.

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Inn Roads

Fishermen's Village

By Kathleen Walls

When you plan a vacation, what do you look for? Fun entertainment? Shopping nearby? Delicious and varied dining? Maybe a cruise or fishing trip?  Museums and art galleries? Fun and games? Of course, comfortable and reasonable priced accommodations are at the top of the list. Would you consider it a dream vacation if all this could all be found at one resort? Well, look no further. The Villas at Fishermen's Village in Punta Gorda, Florida is your dream vacation. Everything you want all together in one resort.

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Main Street

Saved by Art

By Kathleen Walls

Augusta has always been a city that appreciated its art. However, in Augusta, the local artist repaid that devotion well. As the second largest and second oldest city in Georgia, Augusta early on developed a downtown business district with Broad Street as its heart. Broad Street was where citizens shopped, dined, mingled and considered the heart of their city. With the advent of suburbs and malls in the 50s and 60s, Augusta's Broad Street area fell into a decline. Stores closed and became boarded up  graffiti covered buildings where few wanted to venture.

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---------- 

Mountain Road

Where Rednecks Come From: Touring the West Virginia Coalfields

By Kathleen Walls

No, I am not suggesting a seedy bar way back in the woods filled with rough looking characters. I am suggesting  a visit to wild and wonderful West Virginia. Specifically, Southern West Virginia, high in the mountains that are filled with the coal that powers our nation and the people whose lives are built around it..

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Music Row

The Hills Are Alive With The Sounds of Music: West Virginia's Musical Heritage

By  Veronica Byrd and Kathleen Walls

There is more to West Virginia than just coal mining. It has its own voice.  A voice that go deep into the soul, tell stories from a hard life, beginning with the music the Appalachian people brought with them into the heart of the mountains. The music grew from folk music, bluegrass, that lead to rockabilly, country music and even the classics. Witness opera singers from West Virginia like Eleanor Steber from Wheeling and  Elisabeth Baer from Charleston.  Connie Smith, Brad Paisley, Hawkshaw Hawkins, Wilma Lee and Stoney Cooper, and dozens of other musicians who call the Mountain State home are honored in West Virginia's Music Hall of Fame. For some singers the road has led from rags to riches. For many the music grew out of the coal mining tradition.

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Pot Luck

A Taste for tea

By Mary Emma Allen

For relaxation, or as a way to start the day, a cup of tea can't be beat.  Even though I sometimes drink coffee, I prefer tea such as English Breakfast tea, Darjeeling tea and Earl Grey tea.  Drinking tea was a tradition in my family, something my grandmother and mother enjoyed  with family and friends.

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Renee's Route

Phoenix Arizona's Golden Spas

by Renee S. Gordon

The first documented non-native to enter the southwestern portion of our nation was a Moorish-African slave. Estevanico had been a member of the ill-fated Narvaez Expedition in 1527 and was enslaved by the Indians for 5-years. During captivity he learned several native languages and after escaping he was selected to serve as a healer, guide, advance scout and interpreter for a party led by Cabeza de Vaca and in 1539 he took on the same duties for Friar Marcos de Niza.

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Tibs Trails and Tastes

Wildlife Wilderness Week In Pigeon Forge

by Christine Tibbeyts

Pigeon Forge in the winter. That’s my recommendation. Think not about the adrenaline rush of family fun you already know about in this Smoky Mountain neck of the woods. Tennessee woods.

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Tibs Trails and Tastes Special

Meeting The Civilians of Gettysburg

by Christine Tibbetts

No disrespect intended, but the battles of Gettysburg and their strategies elude me. Re-enactments too. 

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Traditional Trails

Hatfield~McCoy Trail

By Kathleen Walls

The Hatfield McCoy feud was too big for one state to contain it all.  It raged along the Tug Fork of the Big Sandy River that separates West Virginia from Kentucky. The Hatfields mainly lived on the West Virginia side while Kentucky was home to most of the McCoys but the families and the feud spilled back and forth  over the states' border.

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Vagabond Traveler

Finding Tea Shops and Tea Collectables

By Mary Emma Allen

In this Internet Age,finding tea shops and cafes in your travels can be relatively easy. I discovered by searching this topic, I came up with many within a 50 mile radius of my home. I even found one in my small hometown.

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Warren's Bi-Ways

Cody Wyoming: Cowboy Town U.S.A.

by Warren Resen
Photographs by Jeanne O'Conner

Yeehaw!This is the one word I think that best describes the most Cowboy of Cowboy Towns I’ve so far visited in the American West. Cowboy Culture thrives here and the people really live it. If you want better service in any restaurant, bar or better seats at the daily Rodeo the secret, we discovered, was to wear your Stetson 24/7 everywhere you go in Cody.  

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Wild Roads

Heaven on Earth Via Kayak

by Kathleen Walls

A kayak trip down a undeveloped creek is like getting a glimpse of what Heaven must be like. Shell Creek which flows off the southernmost section of Peace River in Charlotte County, Florida is one such sacred place. It's a local "secret spot" that deserves more recognition.

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The Winter 2014 issue

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Adirondack Trail Mix  

Riding Steel Rails to Ski Trails: History Revisited

By Persis Granger

The southern Adirondack Mountains have lured snow sports enthusiasts to their snow-clad slopes for at least a century. The crisp winter air, azure skies and white peaks of this vacationers’ Mecca offer irresistible enticement, and the small hamlet of North Creek, NY, has hosted its share of winter adventurers. 

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Agri Lanes

Eckert's Grafton Farm

by Kathleen Walls

Johann Peter Eckert farmed all his life in Dietzenbach, Hesse Darmestadt, Germany. When he emigrated to  Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1837 with his wife and four sons he saw no reason to change. He  went on to buy each of his sons a farm. The family had followed the tradition down to the present  dday.

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Art Trails

DELMARVA PUBLIC ART TRAIL

by Anne Jenkins

Public art offers an interesting, unique and fun way to learn about an area's history, quirks or local flora and fauna. Many big cities around the world show off their artists talents with decorated sculpture forms such as trams and fish in New Orleans, La., bulls in Sydney, Australia or murals in London, England. And now smaller towns and regions are realizing the benefits beautification and economic of public art. The popular holiday destination peninsular, Delmarva, home to Delaware, Maryland and Virginia has an intriguing trail of public art, much of it revolving around the water and the life it sustains. Follow the art (working from north to south), find hidden gems, stay in quaint B&B's or boutique inns and absorb some fascinating history through art.

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Chuckwagon Roundup

The Best Dessert I Ever Ate

by Kathleen Walls

 No question about it, the prettiest dessert I ever ate was a Tahitian Vanilla Bean Crème Brûlée at Cotton Row in Huntsville, Alabama created by pastry chef, Jay Hendricks. With its gleaming strands of spun sugar arching above it for at least six or seven inches, It was almost too beautiful to eat. Almost! It was also the best tasting Crème Brûlée ever.

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Civil War Trails

War on the Waters

by Kathleen Walls

Columbus, Georgia is home to the only museum in the world dedicated to the naval history of the War Between the States. The Port Columbus National Civil War Naval Museum, which opened in the spring of 2001, brings both sides of the conflict together and sheds light on a too-often-ignored aspect of the war: battles that were fought in the water, not on the land.

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Exploring With Eleanor

GO NORTH BY NORTHWEST
Discover Cowboys, Indians, and Corn

By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel

Mention South Dakota and everyone immediately thinks of Mt. Rushmore. I knew that the monument was carved on sacred land belonging to Native Americans, but I didn’t realize how much of the state revolved around their culture and heritage. Using Sioux Falls as my home base, I wanted to explore southeast South Dakota. Sioux Falls is named for the magnificent waters of the Big Sioux River that cascade in Falls Park. As the state’s largest city, visitors can enjoy its pioneer culture, historic sites, friendly residents, a zoo, eclectic shops and 600 restaurants. But I was there to focus on the Great Sioux Nation that once dominated South Dakota.

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Fork in The Road  

Dinner on the Dock

By Kathleen Walls

What is more fun than au fresco dining overlooking a picturesque river.  Dinner on the Dock, held every Thursday during summer at The Prairie Street Brewhouse in Rockford, Illinois, combines all the right elements. It offers a perfect venue for dining  on the Rock River, great food catered by The Backyard Grill and Bar and music by assorted talents.  The event space which is also available for weddings and other events  abuts a 60-slip marina and offers a excellent view of the river. After dark, the lights of the bridge lend a fairytale atmosphere.  It also allows boaters to dock and dine.

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Happy Trails

The du Ponts and Gunpowder

By Tom Straka
Photographs by Pat Straka

If anyone has kept track of our columns, they would have noticed many of the articles deal with charcoal. Charcoal kilns, ironworks, and now even gunpowder. Technically, this column’s travel location is Hagley Museum and Library, an educational institiution located in northernmost Delaware that preserves and interprets the history of American enterprise. However, our real topic is the manufacture of gunpowder.  

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Inn Roads

Cuscowilla on Lake Oconee

By Kathleen Walls

It's always fun to know the history of a place you visit. When you stay at Cuscowilla at Lake Oconee Golf Resort, the story goes way back before the dawn of written history. Native people made their home here far back into prehistoric times. The first settlers recorded as dwelling here were a tribe of the Creek Nation. They built their town on the banks of a river they called the  Okoni, meaning "The Great Water." They named their village Cuscowilla.  

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Music Row

Too Much Fun

By Kathleen Walls

The Second Old City Music Fest held at the St. Augustine Flea Market was really prime time in St. Johns County, Florida. It featured the best of the old with fine up-and-coming musicians. The music was a blend also, some Rock mixed with great Country.

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Off the Beaten Path

Sage Advice About Rosemary Time

By Kathleen Walls

Most of Florida is on Eastern Standard time. Some is on Central Standard Time. Then there are places that have a timing all their own. Rosemary Beach is just a tiny blip on the Florida map in Walton County but it is one of these special places. Here you forget about the usual timed things, Appointments, schedules, routine, none of these apply here. In fact you won't need a watch or clock since the town bells toll on the hour during the day. If you send the kids to play on the green and want them home by 6 pm remind them that when they hear the six dongs ""Ask not for whom the bell tolls. It tolls for thee," Head home.

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Off the Interstate

A Walk in the Park

by Kathleen Walls

Winter Park, Florida  gets neglected. People lump it together with its big sister, Orlando. While Orlando is filled with big theme parks and glitzy attractions, Winter Park is more low key. Winter Park is one of the prettiest little towns in Florida and one of the most artistically inclined. It has its own charm and repays visitors with  memories of a wonderful time. Not only the time they spend enjoying their stay at a unique hotel like Alfond Inn (see earlier article), browsing the boutiques and restaurants on Park Avenue, taking a boat tour of the Winter Park chain of lakes, exploring the Winter Park History Museum, attending the Rollins College Theater or visiting the Farmers Market, they get to glimpse what life was like in another era.  

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Pot Luck

Ice Cream Time in Winter

By Mary Emma Allen

With predictions of 6-10 inches of snow arriving tonight and tomorrow, my thoughts turn to winter traditions, especially those associated with snow. One of those in our family has been making ice cream for New Year's Eve or Day.   We haul out the freezer, stir up a custard, then make vanilla ice cream we can use with various accompaniments-chocolate sauce, crushed strawberries, raspberries, caramel sauce, or simply plain.

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Renee's Route

Experiene it All in East Tennessee

by Renee S. Gordon

Tennessee’s tri-colored flag has a blue emblem in the center of a field of red with three white stars. Each star represents one of three geographic regions, the western lowlands, central highlands and the mountainous east. Each region has a distinctive history and culture and each has a unique story to tell. The state’s documented biography begins in East Tennessee in an area that takes its name from the Appalachian Mountains. Hernando de Soto named them in the 1540s after a northwestern Florida tribe, the Apalachee.

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Road Dog

Micanopy Fall Festival

by Baron Byrd (with a little assistance from Veronica Byrd)

Hi, my paw friends; it′s me again Road Dog, Baron. Just want to tell you about my latest adventurist journey. My human companions and I went to a fall festival located in Micanopy, Florida and it couldn’t have been a better day the weather was just doggone perfect.  

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Tibs Trails and Tastes

Outer Banks National Scenic Byway

by Christine Tibbits

Start this trip in the middle. The National Scenic Byway hugging North Carolina’s fabled Outer Banks provides more tastes and treasures than a traveler could ever access driving all 138 miles north to south.

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Traditional Trails

Tinker Tales

By Kathleen Walls

Right in the heart of Rockford Illinois is a historical and architectural treasure., Tinker Swiss Cottage. The cottage is unique as it is one of just a few Swiss style homes built in the United states.  

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Vagabond Traveler

Activities for Young Travelers

By Mary Emma Allen

Traveling can be fun and educational for young travelers if adults have activities for them.  Also, instead of putting them  solely in front of movies and games (on computers and iPads), draw their attention to sights along the way.  

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Warren's Bi-Ways

H. M. S. Queen Mary

by Warren Resen

With much fanfare, the Queen Mary arrived in Long Beach Harbor on December 1967 to begin its well deserved retirement after 30 years as the premiere luxury liner sailing the waters of the North Atlantic Ocean.   

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Wild Roads

The Eagle Flies

by Kathleen Walls

It all began in 1992 when Georgia Southern University in Statesboro Georgia went in search of a eagle for a mascot. Steve Hein, Director of the university's Wildlife Center, stated "When we decided to get an eagle and not just display it but wrap it in education, I don't think anybody had any notion of what was to follow." 

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American Roads
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Lagniappe

Just a tiny preview of our new column.

 

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Adirondack Trail Mix  

The Great Camp Experience
Part 2, Sagamore

By Persis Granger

Vanderbilt…Morgan…Rockefeller…Carnegie…Durant…Huntington…. The names roll off our tongues like a Gilded Age guest list. Industrial tycoons, railroad magnates and others favored with vast fortunes sought out the beauty and seclusion of the Adirondacks as an alternative to their other posh vacation homes, which they referred to as “cottages.” The cottage style of architecture influenced what would come to be known as the “Adirondack rustic style.” The great camp look used native building materials such as logs, peeled bark and decorative twig ornamentation on porches and in gables. That style lives on today in the log cabin industry and also can be seen in buildings in our National Parks. Rustic furnishings like bent twig chairs, birch bark-faced dressers and sideboards and antler chandeliers extended the theme of a simplicity and oneness with nature. 

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Agri Lanes

Florida's Got Something to Wine About

by Kathleen Walls

Being as far south as it is and predominantly semi-tropical, you wouldn't think Florida would have many wineries. Think again. Florida has am abundance of fine wineries. Since the most commonly used grape used for table wines,  Vitis vinifera.will not grow in a semitropical climate. Consequently Florida wineries have to depend on two options or a variation of them; either import the traditional grape or develop a wine from the varieties that do grow here or use other fruits and even vegetables to produce wine.

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Americans on the Road

Germany's Southern Fairy Tale Route 

by Renee S. Gordon

Germany is focusing on the cities where the brothers lived, worked and wrote and the very real places where the stories were set. The Fairy Tale Route includes not only the towns and villages mentioned but has the added attraction of including Grimms Brothers themed accommodations, dining establishments, festivals, events, museums and historic sites. To the pleasure of many travelers the itinerary can include nights spent in a castle and more than 330 restaurants serving meals made from recipes that belonged to Wilhelm’s wife Dorothea. The route is 372-miles long, from Hanau to Bremen, and includes more than 45 towns and villages and each town presents specific aspects of their lives and careers.  For those wishing to leave the planning to someone else organized tours can be booked online and for as little as $80 per night you can enjoy one of the featured vacations in “Great Holidays on a Small Budget.” The brochure is available online

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Art Trails

Gullah Heritage & Modern Art,
St. Helena Island, S.C.

by Anne Jenkins

A day drive along the art trail of the atmospheric island of St. Helena in South Carolina's Low Country offers exciting original art, a fascinating African-American museum and delicious food. It is an area that begs to be sketched, painted and photographed. You can spend all day dawdling the mere 14 miles loaded with live oaks dripping Spanish moss which, by the way, is very hard to paint, for me anyway - glimpses of salt marshes, white beaches and brilliant blue sky.

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Chuckwagon Roundup

Chug a Love:
Breweries Plus Food Equals Fun

by Kathleen Walls

In Ireland, the savvy traveler knows the best places to eat or the pubs. Here in America' our own version of the pub is emerging. Local breweries which have become popular for their own special designer beers often combine the drafts with the dinner. Here are some I have visited and loved.

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Civil War Trails

From Rail Splitter to President

by Kathleen Walls

I've devoted a lot of space to Confederate persons and sites. I'm a Southerner, what else can I say. Still, in all fairness, the Federal side deserves some space. So this Civil War Trails will look at the Union's top man,  Abraham Lincoln. In particular one town that begun his catapult to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.

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Exploring With Eleanor

Discovering the Best in Little Rock, Arkansas

By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel

When you visit Little Rock, the capital of Arkansas, the “must-see” site is all about the state’s most famous and celebrated native, Bill Clinton: The Clinton Presidential Center. The three buildings of the center sit on 30 acres of a city park, and the public may tour the Library which opened in 2004. Begin by watching a 12-minute video that gives a quick overview of President Clinton’s life and political career. Then continue on to the many exhibits where you can study him in depth. Start with the Alcove Exhibits, whose design was inspired by the library at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland.  Thirteen alcoves concentrate on the policies of Clinton’s administration, and the piers of each alcove contain archive boxes filled with White House correspondence.

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Fork in The Road

Dub's High on the Hog

By Kathleen Walls

Most businesses believe advertising is the way to get customers. Dub's High on the Hog in Calhoun, Georgia, claim they don't even need a sign. Their method of bringing in business is to serve the most tasty, fall-off-the -bone ribs and pulled pork, not to mention the attention paid to all the side dishes like huge baked potatoes and the delicate flavored Brunswick stew. Naturally they serve steak and chicken and all the other staples you expect to find at a barbeque restaurant

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Ghost Trails

Ghosts of the River Bend

By Kathleen Walls

It's Fall and time to look for haunting tales and spooky places. You can't find a more ghostly town than Alton, Illinois and surrounding areas where the river bends in a strange quirk of nature.  Fate Magazine called it "one of the most haunted small towns in America."

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Happy Trails

Tannehill Ironworks Historical State Park

By Tom Straka
Photographs by Pat Straka

There are lots of historical jewels scattered just off the interstates. Tannehill Ironworks Historical State Park is one of them, located near Interstates 20-59-459 between Birmingham and Tuscaloosa in Alabama. The park has all the attractions you’d expect at a 1,500 acre state park. Don’t just think ironworks; think also of a pioneer farm, grist mill, cotton gin, country store, sweet shoppe, craftsmen, blacksmith, hiking, camping, and outdoor recreation.

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Inn Roads

A Hotel that is a Work of Heart

By Kathleen Walls

The Alfond Inn is not built to make its owner rich. In fact, it is going to give away all the money it earns. This brand new 112 room boutique hotel in the heart of Winter Park, Florida is owned by Rollins  College. They call it "A Work of Heart." All net revenue generated by the hotel and its restaurant, Hamilton's Kitchen, will go to The Alfond Scholars program fund, the College's premier scholarship fund, over the next 25 years or until the endowment principal reaches $50 million, whichever comes later.

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Music Row

The Guardian Angle of Hillbilly Heaven

By Kathleen Walls

It was like a dream of Hillbilly Heaven. I was walking in the footsteps of Elvis Presley, Hank Williams, Sr., Johnny Cash and many of the other Country Music greats.  I was getting a backstage tour of the Shreveport Municipal Auditorium, former home of The Louisiana Hayride. The person reveling this wonderland of one of country music’s greatest shrines, was none other than Maggie Warwick.

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Pot Luck

Do You Remember Aprons?

By Mary Emma Allen

In days ago, a cook wouldn't think of appearing in the kitchen without her apron.  Mother had a number of these.  Some were the old-fashioned, full bib ones that covered her from blouse to skirt hem.  Others tied around the waist and covered her skirt.

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Renee's Route

Monumental Arlington County, Virginia

by Renee S. Gordon

The first documented sighting of the area that is now Arlington is attributed to Captain John Smith who in July of 1608 sailed into the region and took note of a Native American village along the river. In 1610 Captain Argall was refused supplies by the tribe and in response burned and pillaged the village. Though the Indians had lived on this land for at least 13,500-years the Iroquois granted all land south of the Potomac and east of the Blue Ridge Mountains to colonial Virginia in 1722.

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Road Dog

Romping in Gold Head State Park

By Baron Byrd (with assistance from Veronica Byrd)

My name is Baron Byrd, but you can call me Road Dog, I am a glossy, 18 pound, min-pin, not quite a year old, and I sure can run real fast. My person can’t even keep up with me. But she is all right I decided to keep her, besides she has a drivers license. So let me tell you about one of our many adventures.  Mike Roess Gold Head State Park, located in Keystone Heights, Fl. It is one of Florida�s first state parks, developed on a 2,000-acre site by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) during the 1930s. Well enough of about that.

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Scenic Roads

Path Thru Paradise

By Kathleen Walls

Much of central Florida is crowded with wall to wall people but here and there you find a break in the crowds. When you peer into these special spots you are overcome by the natural beauty that underlies the Sunshine State. Right in the middle of what is known as the Golden Triangle of Lake County consisting of the cities of  Eustis, Tavares and Mount Dora, there is a hidden gem, Dora Canal. The canal was dug in the 1800s to connect Lake Dora and Lake Eustis.  Although it is only about a mile long, Dora Canal is truly a path though Paradise for a kayaker or canoer.

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Street Party

The Music never Dies

By Kathleen Walls

There are some places where the music never dies. I discovered one in Alton, Illinois. you may think of Alton as part of Abraham Lincoln's heritage. or the home of the world's tallest man. Maybe it brings to mind the image of the Picta Bird.

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Tibs Trails and Tastes

Six ways to connect
past with present in Independence, Missouri

By Christine Tibbets

Off they went from Independence, Missouri in 1845, heading west, and I imagined myself going along, blazing a trail west from Independence, Missouri.

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Traditional Trails

Midway Village

By Kathleen Walls

Midway Village in Rockford, Illinois is a few miles and a hundred plus years from modern downtown Rockford. It's 137 acres of yesterday. Here you do more than learn about the past, you relive it. The village contains buildings all dating from between 1830, the year Rockford, originally called Midway because it was halfway between Chicago and Galena, was founded, and 1904. Most are authentic buildings moved to the village site. Six are reproductions differing only in scale from the original building. The oldest building in the village dates to 1840.

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e

Vagabond Traveler

Traveling Country Roads in Autumn,

By Mary Emma Allen

Traveling over country roads in autumn, when colorful foliage is at its peak, provides us with an enchanting adventure.  Although the superhighways offer vibrant vistas, the winding country roads present an interesting and relaxing way to travel.  

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Warren's Bi-Ways

Bishop’s Lodge Ranch Resort & Spa

by Warren Resen
Photos by Jeanne O'Connor

Bishop’s Lodge Ranch Resort & Spa was the first planned stop after leaving West Palm Beach on our 2013 cross country road trip. Until then it was just drive and stop for the night where ever we were. 

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he Spring 2013 Edition American Roads Magazine

     

    Adirondack Trail Mix  

    Wiawaka
    Manifesting A Woman’s Dream Of
    Renewal For The Spirit Of All Women

    By Persis Granger

    The Village of Lake George, on the southern fringe of New York’s Adirondack Mountains, is a Mecca for tourists, poised at the south end of the 32-mile lake for which it is named. Motels and eateries line Canada Street, along with shops promising everything from T-shirts to tattoos. On hot summer days, Million Dollar Beach and its smaller counterpart at Shephard’s Park are packed with swimmers and sun worshipers. The cannon at Fort William Henry booms at predictable intervals and a calliope pipes tunes as an old paddle-wheeler filled with passengers churns its way along a sight-seeing route a few miles down the lake and back again. There’s no shortage of daytime activities and shopping in Lake George Village, and at dusk the rollicking nightlife begins.

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    Agri Lanes

    Funny Food Festivals

    by Kathleen Walls

    Agri-tourism is an important new trend in travel. Taken in its broadest form it is a means promoting any agricultural, aqui-cultural or ranching enterprise in an area.   One form of agri-tourism has been going on for a long time. Local food festivals are a way a town or area promotes and brags about its favorite local agricultural product.  I have gathered a few of the most unusual festivals of this kind.

    Read Agri Lanes_Click Here

    Americans on the Road

    Smooth Traveler:
    Glasgow, Scotland, Experience the Spirit

    by Ren�e S. Gordon

    An old Scottish proverb states, “Twelve highlanders and a bagpipe make a rebellion.” While this is not entirely accurate it is a huge indication of the character of the people. Their independence has shaped their character and pride in their shared culture, history and institutions, is visible everywhere and it is all laced with an ability to embrace life and laugh at it all. Glasgow, the largest city in Scotland, is the ideal place to learn about and experience the real Scotland in all its manifestations.

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    Art Trails

    Wow Delaware:
    Wee state, Outstanding art, Wonderful museums

    by Anne Jenkins

    Delaware often gets overshadowed by her flashy big neighbors   the mega-metropolis' of Washington D.C., Philadelphia and New York but don't be fooled, it's no sleepy hollow. Delaware is a feisty, independent little state with a vibrant art scene.  And the arts are anchored by three top-class institutions, the excellent Delaware Art Museum (DAM), the edgy and innovative Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts (dcca) in the big northern city of Wilmington and the charming Biggs Museum of American Arts in the heritage park of the capitol, Dover.

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    Chuckwagon Roundup

     They Take the Cake

    by Kathleen Walls

    Everyone want to enjoy a great restaurant but sometimes being a great restaurant isn't enough. Bakeries who can provide a special cake are necessary for birthdays and special occasions but what about that hearty sandwich or special meal?  However when you combine the two you have a place you want to visit regularly. That's the case with these restaurants/bakeries that combine great food with fantastic cakes you have a sure winner. Here are some of my favorite cafe and bakery combination.

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    Civil War Trails

    The General

    by Kathleen Walls

    The outcome of war is often decided by events other than battles. The Kennesaw/Marietta area was the scene of one of the Civil War’s most daring spy stories.  It began with a secret meeting in Fletcher House, now Marietta History Museum on the night of April 11, 1862.

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    Cort's Crossroads

    Carrabelle~Discover Old Florida
    Where Time Stands Still


    by Leigh Cort

    I imagined that one day I would find a secret place in Florida that would capture my imagination with intoxicating stories and images of the people who were courageous enough to pioneer its mystical treasures. Driving four hours from northeast Florida to Carrabelle, an easy journey toward Tallahassee then southward through the Osceola National Forest to the Gulf of Mexico, I expected a serious dose of solitude. What I discovered was a porthole into the rare beauty of the ‘Forgotten Coast’. I couldn’t recall why I chose to visit this tiny rural community of long-gone conquistadors, gamblers and tycoons. But by the time I returned home, I couldn’t imagine why I would ever want to leave again.

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    Exploring With Eleanor

    Guten Tag, Texas

    By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel

    With all the buzz about the popular new film, Django Unchained, many moviegoers have questioned the presence of the German, Dr. King Schultz, in antebellum Texas. (Christoph Waltz won an Academy Award for the role.) Actually, he wasn’t a figment of the screenwriter’s dramatic license, because beginning in the 1830s, thousands of Germans migrated to Texas. Throughout the Lone Star State, traces of German history have been lost, but, of those who settled in the gritty Hill Country, much of Old World Deutschland heritage has been retained in Fredericksburg (which was named for Prince Frederick of Prussia).

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    Fork in The Road

    The Mint: It's Solid Gold

    By Kathleen Walls

    Dining at the Mint Restaurant in Ridgeland just outside Jackson is a treat that is hard to beat. When I went there for dinner,  I  fell in love with the decor before I ever put a bite of the food into my mouth. It was so impressive. The huge glowing red chandelier over the bar would do justice to a exclusive 19th century brothel in the old Crescent City.

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    Happy Trails

    Revolutionary War Trails:
    Ninety Six

    By Tom Straka
    Photographs by Pat Straka

    Which state can claim the most Revolutionary War battle sites? Probably Massachusetts or Virginia came to your mind. South Carolina can claim that distinction with 250 Revolutionary War battle sites. One of the major battle sites is Ninety Six. In the 1700’s it was at the edge of the frontier, strategically located at the intersection of major Indian trails and, supposedly, 96 miles from the Cherokee Indian village of Keowee. The location made it a trading hub.  In 1760 frontier friction between Indians and settlers developed and a stockade was quickly built at Ninety Six. Fort Ninety Six offered protection from two Indian attacks.  A peace treaty allowed settlement up to the Keowee area.

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    Inn Roads

    Beau Rivage:
    Everything  You Want

    By Kathleen Walls

    Beau Rivage in Biloxi, Mississippi is a city within a city. Whether you want to pull the slot leaver, flip a blackjack card or play high stakes poker, The Beau Rivage Resort & Casino can accommodate you. In fact, even if you have no interest in gaming, you can shop, swim, surf or pool, get a massage or loll in a spa, dock at the marina or dine, be it snack or elegant cuisine, the Beau Rivage can accommodate travelers of any stripe. It fits anyone to a “T.”

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    Music Row

    The Father of Country Music

    By Kathleen Walls

    Jimmie Rodgers was born on September 8, 1897, in Meridian, Mississippi, with a love of music in his heart. His mother died when he was very young and he was shuttled  off to relatives until his father remarried and brought him back to Meridian. Perhaps he had a premonition that his life would not be long so he started early to follow his dream. By the time he entered his teens, he had already run away twice to do a musical tour.

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    Pot Luck

    Pioneer Foods Inspired by Sarah Jane

    By Mary Emma Allen

    As I wrote my current Vagabond Traveler article for American Roads, about Plymouth, NH's 250th Anniversary, I wondered about foods grown and served in those days, foods you might find in other parts of the country, too, as you travel. Then I recalled my story about Sarah Jane.

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    Product Review

    Lightload Towels

    By Kathleen Walls

    These towels prove the old saying "good things come in small packages." They come as a deceptively tiny flat round  package. However, when you wet them, they open up to show their true character, a full size towel capable of many useful functions.

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    Ren�e's Route

    Delaware's Corridor of Courage

    by Ren�e S. Gordon

    The course of both slavery and abolitionism in Delaware was directed largely by three factors, its geographical position as a border state, the fact that no labor-intensive year round crop flourished there and the religious influence of the Methodists and the Quakers. There were never the large plantations, or numbers of enslaved, that developed deeper south, the largest owner having less than 70 enslaved workers. A single slave arrived in 1639, “Black” Anthony, the first black documented resident, aboard the Vogel Grip. At some point he was freed and by 1648 he was serving as the assistant of Governor Printz. By 1750 the number increased to 1,000 and on the eve of the American Revolution there were 2,000. The 1779 federal census records 8,887 slaves and 3,899 free blacks. Immediately prior to the Civil War there were less than 2,000 slaves and 19,829 free blacks in the state.

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    Scenic Route 

    Falling for the Park

    By Kathleen Walls

    The Falls of the Big Sioux River has been the heart of the area even before the founding of its namesake city of Sioux Falls in 1856. There is evidence that Paleolithic tribes used the falls area for much the same purpose it is used today, as a recreational area. The Lakota, who were the native people in the area when the white settlers first arrived, visited the falls for that purpose and told stories of them to European explorers.

    read Scenic Route- Click Here�

     

    Vagabond Traveler

    Enjoy Plymouth's 250th Celebration

    By Mary Emma Allen

    Experience the excitement of celebrations in various towns, villages and cities as you travel. These may commemorate historical events or present day festivities. However, they'll bring enjoyment to your visits in those locations.

    Read Vagabond Traveler - Click Here

     

    Warren's Bi-Ways

    See the USA in your Chevrolet Part Two

    by Warren Resen

    After more than a month on the road, it was time to turn around and start heading back east. Leaving Cody, Wyoming, we headed for Devils Tower in eastern Wyoming, a must stop before entering South Dakota. This remarkable monolith, the remains of an extinct volcano, was used as a focal point in the movie “Close Encounters of the Third Kind.” It was also this nation’s first national monument so declared by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1906.

     

    read Warren's Bi-Ways- Click Here�


    The Winter 2013 Edition American Roads Magazine

    Main Street

    By Kathleen Walls

    American Roads is proud to present the 2013 Winter Edition of American Roads Magazine.

     
    • .

    Adirondack Trail Mix

    Saranac Lake Winter Carnival – The Ice is Nice

    By Persis Granger

    “S’posed to get down below zero tonight.”

    “’Bout time!”

    Exchanges like the above are common in early winter in Saranac Lake, NY, a central Adirondack town. It lies about ten miles from Lake Placid, the village that was home of the 1932 and 1980 winter Olympics. Long periods of cold weather make ice, and ice is big in Saranac Lake, whose frozen lakes, before the days of electrical refrigeration, chilled ice boxes all over the country. And, since 1897, Pontiac Bay also has yielded frigid building blocks for an ice palace that glistens center stage at the annual Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. “That is why we may be one of the few places in the country where people actually hope for cold weather,” says Jeff Dickson, carnival organizer.

     

    read Adirondack Trail Mix- Click Here�

    Agri Lanes

    I Hear an ECHO

    by Kathleen Walls

    ECHO (Educational Concerns for Hunger Organization) introduces you to some of the strangest plants and animals you will ever meet.

    You can sample produce like guavas, cassava, Carabola, called the star fruit because of its star shape when sliced and experience the taste changes caused by the Miracle Fruit. When you chew this berry first, lemons and other sour or bitter food will taste sweet. Who wouldn't love the Peanut Butter Fruit?

    Read Agri Lanes_Click Here

    Art Trails

    Southeastern Delaware Artists Studio Tour

    by Anne Jenkins

     A group of seven artists in the rural Sussex County of South Eastern Delaware got together in1995 to try and promote their burgeoning art community. They chose to launch the SE Delaware Artists Studio Tour on the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving because, ‘no one did anything during the Thanksgiving weekend back then,‘ remembers one the pioneers. Now, eighteen years later, it’s a popular annual tradition and attracts enthusiastic large crowds. 

    Read Art_Trails.htm

    Chuckwagon Roundup

    Fill 'er Up

    by Kathleen Walls

    When you have a really big hunger, nothing satisfies like an "all you can eat" buffet. Here are some of the best I have found.

    read Chuckwagon roundup Click Here �

     

    Civil War Trails

    On to Olustee

    by Kathleen Walls

    During the War Between the States, Florida played an important, if understated, role. True, no major battles were fought there. None of the battles were turning points in the war. Florida's main service to the Confederacy was feeding its armies. Florida provided  much of the beef, pork, fish, fruit and salt needed by the troops.

     

    read Civil War Trails-Click Here �

    Cort's Crossroads

    From the Sandaway, With Love

    by Leigh Cort

    I yearn to return to the Sandaway – quietly embracing the long Indian summer days on the shore of the Chesapeake, Choptank and Tred Avon Rivers. A graceful and stately mansion with sloping green lawns & gardens …dotted with white Adirondack chairs and chaises – reminiscent of a turn-of-the century postcard. It’s a sentinel of gracious Southern living – Oxford, Maryland embraces four centuries of American history surrounded by three renowned bodies of water.

    read Corts Crossroads-Click Here �

    Exploring With Eleanor

    Mobile's G-Rated Mardi Gras and Other Dixie Delights

    By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel

    A band struts by, horns blaring, drums thumping. A papier-m�ch� float, representing a medieval castle and festooned with sparkling decorations, approaches. The riding masked revelers cast gifts to the throngs below. The crowd goes wild. “Throw me something, mister!” they shout. I grab a moon pie. Others catch beads, candy, stuffed animals and more. Soon the somber season of Lent will be here. But right now, laissez les bon temps rouler! (French for “Let the good times roll!”) 

    Ah, yes… Mardi Gras in New Orleans. No! It’s Mardi Gras in Mobile, Alabama, the birthplace of the famous celebration.

    read Exploring With Eleanor- Click Here�

    Fork in The Road

    Flitter Over to Firefly

    By Kathleen Walls

    When you think of Panama City Beach, you usually think of the type of food enjoyed by spring breakers; burgers, fries and the like. Being known as the "Redneck Riviera" doesn't help envision a  gourmet restaurant either. Yet right in the heart of the beach city, there is Firefly proving all the stereotypes wrong by serving award winning food  fit for a king, or perhaps a president.

    read Fork in the Road - Click Here �

    Happy Trails

    Pennsylvania Trails: A Colonial Homestead and a Railroad Museum

    By Tom Straka
    Photographs by Pat Straka

    Pennsylvania has a vast choice of roadside cultural attractions. Two that are close by to each other in Amish Country are Daniel Boone’s childhood colonial homestead and the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania. Both, operated by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, are fascinating ways to learn more about American history in an environment that also allows for a fun time. The homestead has a number of related historical displays along its walking trails. Next to the railroad museum is the Strasburg Railroad and a chance to ride a steam locomotive.

    read Happy Trails - Click Here�

    High Roads

    Airline Food Survey

    By Kathleen Walls

    For those of you who prefer to fly over American Roads instead of driving them, this should be of interest

     

    read High Roads - Click Here �

    Inn Roads

    Laketown Wharf Resort

    By Kathleen Walls

    My assistant/daughter, Veronica, and I visited Panama City Beach in November (See Off the Interstate)  and had a great experience. We stayed at the Laketown Wharf Resort in an Egret apartment, one of three larger vacation rentals,  with  a full kitchen–it was so nice not to have to squeeze everything into a mini-fridge– a great room, two bedrooms, two baths and over 1200 sq ft of space. We were not there long enough to need it but it was nice having our own washer and dryer in the unit just in case. There was a balcony with a gorgeous water view overlooking the gulf.

    read Inn Roads - Click Here�

    Music Row

    Opera Houses

    By Kathleen Walls

    In the 19th century, opera houses were the ultimate mark of civilization. Big cities and small towns strove to open and maintain an opera house. In this era before movies and TV, live entertainment  was the only public entertainment available. Even small towns opened Opera Houses to attract traveling entertainers. Many were called "Grand” which came from the theatre guide book of that time period and was designated to theatres meeting certain qualifications regarding the building's structure. In spite of the name, it was not only operas that were performed in the theatre. In most cases they provided a place to perform the most popular traveling shows of that time, including vaudeville shows, minstrels and even some of the earliest silent movies. Here are some of the most interesting I have visited.

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    Off the Beaten Trail

    Hot Diggity Dog

    By Kathleen Walls

    Cruising across America's highways and byways to all the fun festivals and events in a 27-foot-long dog with six captain-style armchairs and a 180 degree windshield and getting paid to do it, what a way to tour the country! There are only twelve active Hotdoggers driving a Weinermobile. I recently met two young people who are doing just that. Hot Diggity Holly and Jess Grillin' are having the time of their lives while learning new skills that will help in later career choices.

    read Off the Beaten Trail- Click Here�

    Off the Interstate

    Rediscover Panama City Beach

    By Kathleen Walls

    If you are young–or young at heart–Panama City beach is a great vacation spot any time of year. Sure the season there is supposed to be summer and spring break time, but there are good reasons to visit during the off season. Unless you are a college student or a lover of noise and traffic jams, you best avoid the spring break time. For the rest of the world, September and October are the months when you experience the best of both seasons.

    read Off the Interstate- Click Here�

    Pot Luck

    Pie Customs Around the Country

    By Mary Emma Allen

    As I study recipes and travel the country I find various customs involving pies...the types made and the times they're served. For instance, there is Pecan Pie in the South, Key Lime Pie in Florida, Strawberry Pie in season, Mock Apple Pie when you can't acquire apples, Vinegar Pie a pioneer hand down in the Mid West..

    read Pot Luck - Click Here�

    Ren�e's Route

    Saint Paul Minnesota: Last of the East, First of the West

    by Ren�e S. Gordon

    Saint Paul is a rich multicultural so destination filled with attractions, heritage and history that it can be experienced in a variety of ways. It is small enough to be considered one of America’s most livable cities but large enough to offer visitors first-class accommodations and dining opportunities. The city is divided into 17 distinct districts, each with its own tales to tell.

    read Renee's Route- Click Here�

    Traditional Trail

    The Shakers of Pleasant Hill

    By Kathleen Walls

    Long ago and far away, a simple peace loving people were searching for a place they could live in harmony with nature and their fellow man. In 1779, a few of their number had sailed from their homeland in search of a place to settle. Many settled in New York and founded a colony there. In 1805 some of the group moved down into Kentucky. They found a beautiful land of rolling hills and streams. The soil was rich. They put down roots in a rural area they called Pleasant Hill.

    read Traditional Trail- Click Here�

    Vagabond Traveler

    Traveling Through Books

    By Mary Emma Allen

    I've always been fascinated with actual places found in novels and often use this information as a guide for my traveling around the country. I keep an atlas beside my reading chair and pull it out to see where the stories are set and where characters might live and travel.

    Sometimes I've visited the area of the country in my travels beforehand, so can readily visualize the scenes the author describes. Even so, I'll pull out my atlas to refresh my memory.

    Read Vagabond Traveler - Click Here

    Warren's Bi-Ways

    See the USA in your Chevrolet Part Two

    by Warren Resen

    You know you are not in Florida anymore, or the southeast for that matter, when the landscape changes from green to brown. Roads run arrow straight and you can see tomorrow’s weather coming over a table-top flat landscape and mile after mile of highways are devoid of any other traffic. For this article, I’d like to offer a few hints on survival in these foreign climes.

    read Warren's Bi-Ways- Click Here�

    Wild Roads

    The Great Great Plains Zoo and Museum

    By Kathleen Walls

    Nature lovers who visit Sioux Falls will fall in love with The Great Plains Zoo. In this 45 acre park, you can visit animals from the North American plains, glide over to Africa and see the animals of the savanna in very natural surroundings, then slip over to Asia and admire the big cats before you hop down under for the Australian wildlife. Plus there are special exhibits for the flamingos, the Birds, Bugs and Amphibians, the penguins and everybody's favorites the primates. Young visitors will be enthralled by the barnyard creatures at Hy-Vee Face-to-Face Farm. All told, over 1,000 animals from around the world.

     

    read Wild Roads- Click Here�

 

 

 

 

The Fall 2012 Edition American Roads Magazine

Adirondack Trail Mix

Fall In Love with the Adirondack Region

By Persis Granger

Fall is no wishy-washy affair in the Adirondacks. There's no seamless progression from summer to winter here. The seasons change with an explosion of reds, golds, yellows and oranges, with the crunch of tinder-dry leaves underfoot, with a crackle and snap of freezing nights that whisper of winter to come and sing sad songs of summer past. Activities and ambiance evolve with the seasons. Canada geese trumpet the change in their southward journeys, settling down here or there to glean a cornfield before continuing on. Residents lay in supplies of firewood, and the sharp smell of wood smoke slices the air. Cold cellaring, canning, freezing or pickling prepares beets, carrots, potatoes, cabbage, squash and pumpkins for winter storage. Lush garden plots fall fallow.

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Agri Lanes

Olive Forge Herb Garden

by Kathleen Walls

Marsha and Darryl Herren are an amazing couple. Seniors, who are their own best advertisement for staying healthy with herbs, they run Georgia's only licensed herb farm. This place is amazing. You can find over 350 varieties of culinary, medicinal and wreath herbs. Their gardens and gift shop, The Still Room, are available for browsing.

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Art Trails

MID-CITY ARTISTS STUDIO TOUR, WASHINGTON, D.C.

by Anne Jenkins

For a truly refreshing view of the nation's capital, ignore the politics, intrigue, lobbyists and world class art museums when you head to Washington, D.C. and take a tour on the real side of life and discover the local art. The funky, vibrant neighborhood, around 14 th Street NW between U-Street and Q Street (or DuPont & Logan Circles), hosts the Mid-City Artists Studio tour twice a year in spring and fall. The fall one is coming up the weekend of October 13-14, but keep checking their website for the next one if you miss this one.

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Chuckwagon Roundup

Unique Eats

by Kathleen Walls

Biblical dinner in The Explorations in Antiquity Center in LaGrange, Georgia has to rank as number one in the unique category. LaGrange's history goes back to the Revolutionary war but this local museum will take you even farther back. The Center, a unique attraction about anthropological finds in the Holy Land, has guides dressed in biblical costumes to explain life in that time frame. You can even enjoy a "Biblical Meal" served in a realistic setting. The museum offers two rooms with reclining tables where you sit on cushions on the floor to eat just as people in the first century would have done. The “Jerusalem Biblical Meal Room” is a copy of one discovered at Pompeii. The “Mount Zion Biblical Meal Room” is a replica of one discovered at Herculaneum.

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Civil War Trails

Tunnel Hill

by Kathleen Walls

Tunnel Hill is a tiny community in the northwest corner of Georgia. Today, their claim to fame is the Western and Atlantic Tunnel. The small tunnel built in 1850 was the first railroad tunnel built south of the Mason Dixon line. It was strategically important to both the North and South in the Civil War. Because of this, it was one of the bloodiest battle sites of the war.

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Cort's Crossroads

St. Francis Inn  

by Leigh Cort

In 1985, Joe Finnegan and his wife Margaret bought the St. Francis Inn (circa 1791) believing ?If you want a successful business in the hospitality industry, everything you do is for your guest's pleasure and comfort.? Nearly 30 years later, they still believe in their philosophy along with a dedicated professional staff, many of whom have been employed at the Inn nearly as long.

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Exploring With Eleanor

Surprising Small Town Atlanta

By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel

Strung north of big city Atlanta, a chain of small towns offers everything that a traveler desires, but at a slower pace. Whether you're looking for a weekend getaway or longer, these metro Atlanta villages will surprise and delight you.

read Exploring With Eleanor- Click Here�

Fork in The Road

It's Elements

By Kathleen Walls

What do you get when you cross a bistro with an art gallery? How about mixing it all up in an old silent-movie theater in Lyons, Georgia? You don't need to be Sherlock Holmes to figure that one out: "It's Elements, Doctor Watson."

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Happy Trails

Civil War Trails: The Antietam Campaign

By Tom Straka

Photographs by Pat Straka

Yes, this is an article about the Civil War battle at Antietam, or Sharpsburg to a Southerner. The North named battles after the nearest body of water, while the South used the nearest settlement. But it is not about the battlefield. Rather, it is about the campaign routes Lee used to get from Virginia to Antietam and back. The trail that Robert E. Lee's troops took to get to Antietam can be just as interesting as the battlefield itself.

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Inn Roads

Farmhouse Inn

By Kathleen Walls

The Farmhouse Inn is a bed and breakfast with a country style twist. The rooms are in a white clapboard farmhouse-style tin-roofed building and decorated in a cozy farm style. A community room with a fireplace and lots of games is there if you choose to enjoy some indoor time.

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Mountain Trails

Wildcat Lodge

By Kathleen Walls

High up near the top of North Georgia's mountains is a place of history, mystery and just plain fun. Wildcat Lodge is located in tiny Suches, Georgia. Those who haven't yet discovered this hidden treasure are in for a treat when they do.

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Native Trails

Follow That Star

By Kathleen Walls

What better way to learn about a people and their culture is to study their art. For the art of the Sioux people, Prairie Star Gallery in Sioux Falls is place to visit. First thing to know is that "Sioux" is a nomenclature used by Europeans to designate several tribes and means "Little Snakes in the Grass." These proud people call themselves Lakota, Dakota or Nakota which mean "friendly people. There are all just different dialects of the Lakota people.

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Pot Luck

Autumn Foilage Crafts & Cooking

By Mary Emma Allen

The leaves have begun turning colorful and taking on their brilliant red, orange and yellow hues, painting the countryside with nature's palette.

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Ren�e's Route

Prince William County & Manassas, Virginia

by Ren�e S. Gordon

Prince William County was mandated in 1731 by Virginia's General Assembly and named in honor of the third son of King George, Prince William. When John Smith arrived in 1608 two tribes shared the area, the Dogue, Algonquians, and the Manahoac, a Siouan tribe. Because the Manahoac were more nomadic the colonists had the most contact with the Dogue and though the Dogue were friendly eventually they came to be thought of as liars and cheats. It is widely held that ?to lie like a dog? is from this era. By 1730 the Native Americans had moved from the area.

read Renee's Route- Click Here�

Table Talk

Hannah Erasmus Wins

Culinary Dream Contest For Children

A student at PV Rawlings Elementary School in Ponte Vedra Beach, Hannah Erasmus, has a passion for food although she's only ten years old. Her dream was to spend a day in the kitchen of a chef's restaurant learning about nutritious cooking and how to protect the planet's future from the farm to the table . Her winning entry story reflected an awareness of nutrition and cooking for the family as she entered Chef Jean-Stephane Poinard's competition to win ? My Day in a Chef's Kitchen' .

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Traditional Trail

Walk on the Wilder Side

No 20th century author has done more to bring frontier life to the forefront than Laura Ingalls Wilder. Her Little House on the Prairie series did more than enchant young people with her adventures as a child growing up on the American frontier. It inspired one of the most popular television family shows of all time. Little House on the Prairie ran for almost a decade. It also gave children and the young at heart of several other countries a touch of frontier life with the Japanese program, Laura, The Prairie Girl and the UK series, Jackanory.

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Vagabond Traveler

Collecting Friends...A Travelers Bonus

By Mary Emma Allen

Some people collect souvenirs such as seashells, plates, tea cups, spoons, bookmarks, postcards, dolls, and other memorabilia from places they visit. My husband Jim and I find our lives expanded and enriched by the people we encounter and the friends we make.

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Warren's Bi-Ways

See the USA in your Chevrolet

by Warren Resen

After years of foreign travel, with all of the accompanying discomfort and indignities of airline travel, worries about safety, revolutions and natural disasters, it was time to get in our car despite the price of gas and see this country where there are no currency changing hisses and people speak the same language, well basically.

 

read Warren's Bi-Ways- Click Here�

The Summer 2012 Edition American Roads Magazine

Main Street

By Kathleen Walls

American Roads is proud to present the 2012 Summer Edition of American Roads Magazine.

As always, there is a wide variety of destinations.

All of my books are still available at my personal site, www.katywalls.com   or at Amazon.com   or
Just click here to email me

read Main Street - Click Here

Adirondack Trail Mix

All Aboard for �Railroads on Parade�
By Persis Granger

As you travel up New York's Adirondack Northway (I-87), it's easy to breeze right past the tiny town of Pottersville without realizing what gems reward those who follow the exit



signs. Flip on your turn signal and join the growing number of those who have discovered Pottersville's amazing new attraction, Railroads on Parade, located at 7903 NYS route 9, the town's main street.

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Adirondack Trail Mix 2

Adirondack Adventure beyond Lake George Village:

Ten Minutes North: The Sembrich

By Persis Granger

For over a century, Lake George Village in the southern Adirondacks has been a Mecca for tourists from near and far. With the main drag, Canada Street, lined with little shop draw visitors after they've sunned themselves silly on the beach, ridden the steamboat, wave runners or parasail and are ready to shop. Much has remained over the decades - the T-shirts, post cards, ice cream cones, pizzas, miniature golf and arcades. One night a week in summer there are open air concerts in the park, and sometimes fireworks over pristine Lake George. Many, after enjoying the shopping, dining and diversions of the village, are ready to explore. This writer suggests heading north on route 9N, also known as Lake Shore Drive.

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Agri Lanes

Agri Hotspots

by Kathleen Walls

In this issue, American Roads is beginning a new column, Agri Lanes. We all enjoy eating and surely traveling, so what better than exploring the unique places our food comes from. Agritourism is becoming mo e and more popular fueled by the trend of farm to table and no doubt by the alarming recalls and warnings about processed food and salmonella outbreaks. Also in more urban societies, children have no concept of where food comes from. A classic example is the person seeing tongue on a menu exclaims, "I don't want to eat anything that has been in an animal's mouth . I'll have an egg sandwich instead."

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Art Trails

MOSAIC - THE REHOBOTH BEACH GALLERY COLLECTIVE

by Anne Jenkins

Rehoboth Beach, Delaware's premier beach town, hums along dancing to it's own vibe. The town encompasses many different levels of pleasure and culture in a relatively small area - from magnificent art galleries, first rate theater, fine photography and superb handmade jewelry to a boardwalk with tee-shirt shops and old fashioned ice cream shops. They all happily jostle alongside each other - a something for just-about-everyone kind of town. It's friendly, a live and let live place boasting a wonderful beach and, although it can get pretty crowded at the height of summer, a seashore that gives a sense of space and big sky.

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Chuckwagon Roundup

The Best Thing I Ever Ate

by Kathleen Walls

Chuckwagon Round Up is one of our two new features. It is always going to be a grouping of different dishes, chefs or restaurants that are noteworthy. For this first column, what better way to start then with The Best Thing I Ever Ate . Those of you who watch the Cooking Chanel are familiar with the show of the same name. Like the show, I am going to reminisce about what that thing was. Some of these dishes are tied as I could not decide which was best when both make me salivate just thinking about them.

read Chuckwagon roundup Click Here �

 

Civil War Trails

Searching for the Real Jefferson Davis

by Kathleen Walls

You can find all the dry historical information about Jefferson Davis online or in books. Sure, he was the president of the Confederate States. Before that he was a West Pointer, a colonel in the Mexican War, a United States senator, the son-in-law of President Zackary Taylor and secretary of War under Franklyn Pierce. Bur if you want to find the real man under all the historical facts, you need to visit the important places in his life.

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Cort's Crossroads

Horse Stamp Inn  

by Leigh Cort

Imagine your cares melting away as you drive along Horse Stamp Church Road ~ making up for lost time in a place where time stands still.

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Dusty Roads

Cool Caddy's & Rusted Relics

By Mike Marino

Combine the elements of asphalt and chrome, and you end up with one nitro methane fuel-injected work of art. We're talking' real garage style Guggenheim stuff too. America has been addicted to asphalt and auto's like a nation of full of leaded and unleaded junkie's. Originally, the Detroit metal masters of machinery turned out pretty simple transportation to satisfy the growing motoring needs of an industrial nation that was entering a phase of horsepower puberty. A nation hell bent on going somewhere, anywhere, fast..faster..and even faster still. Eventually, there was an intercourse of speed and style, and in the 1940s' the cars started to get a little class, and in the process, the mechanics of The Motor City were turning into the Monet's of Motown.

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Exploring With Eleanor

Going Green in the Grand Canyon

By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel

Hoards of people visit the Grand Canyon each year. They arrive by automobile and every other type of motorized vehicle. More than 100 years ago, they arrived a little worse for wear in a jarring, back-breaking stagecoach. But that wagon didn't pollute the air. If we travel there in a mass transit vehicle, we can pollute it less. We can go green to and inside the park.

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Fork in The Road

Walnut Hills:

Vicksburg's Traditional Restaurant

By Kathleen Walls

Every city has its traditional restaurant, the place locals always bring an out-of-town guest, the eatery that is totally unique to that city. In Vicksburg, Mississippi, that place is Walnut Hills.

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Happy Trails

Gold Trails: The Reed Mine

By Tom Straka

Photographs by Pat Straka

Where was the first documented gold strike in the United States? Many people would think it was somewhere out West, but it was in North Carolina, not far from Charlotte. (The occurrence of gold in the U.S. was noted before this strike, but none were significant enough to lead to mining).

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Inn Roads

Ground Zero

By Kathleen Walls

If you are die-hard Blues fan there is one place that will bring the Blues into your life like no other place on earth, Ground Zero Blues Club. Ground Zero is not just another blues club. It is as close as you can get to the roots of the blues.

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Music Row

Birthplace of the King

By Kathleen Walls

Most of Elvis's fans have made the pilgrimage to Graceland. His most devote followers recognize the importance of that earlier shrine, his birthplace in Tupelo Mississippi. After all without the birthplace there would have been no Graceland.

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Pot Luck

The Enjoyment Of Picnic Time

By Mary Emma Allen

Whether you're traveling on a lengthy trip or simply going out for the day, summertime means picnic time when we enjoy eating out-of-doors. This may be a backyard barbecue at Uncle Don and Aunt Susie's, a basket lunch at the lake, or an outdoor meal when hiking or traveling. Often children simply like to eat out on the deck or in the yard and pretend they're on a journey.

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Ren�e's Route

Delaware, �A Small Wonder�

by Ren�e S. Gordon

The state of Delaware is a mere 96-miles long, 36-miles wide at its widest point, is comprised of only three counties. While Delaware's colonial history largely follows the trajectory of the other 12 colonies it has stories that are stunningly unique and the footprints of these tales can be traced from Claymont to Fenwick Island We are going to begin our exploration of the state's singular sites in southern Delaware's Sussex County. Sussex the largest and most rural of the three manages to be jam-packed with history, mystery, slaves, knaves, treasure, 24-miles of sandy shoreline, 47 bays, 10 beaches and all manner of leisure options.

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Street Party

On The Bourbon Trail

by Kathleen Walls

If you want to head your party bus �or family car�for the most fun in Kentucky, go for twenty-first annual Kentucky Bourbon Festival. The festival, held in Bardstown, September 11 � 16, 2012, celebrates Kentucky's long love affair with the art of making great Kentucky Bourbon.

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Vagabond Traveler

Hiking Season Offers Many Pleasures

By Mary Emma Allen

Hikes through the woodlands add pleasure to country living or visiting. Now's the time to get prepared for those treks into the solitude of a forest world. Our family has always enjoyed hiking, whether in the woods around our home, longer hikes through New Hampshire's White Mountains where we live, or treks in the Rockies of the West where we often visit.

 

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Warren's Bi-Ways

Cowboy Up

by Warren Resen

The event was billed as a �Cowboy-Up� weekend at Crescent J Ranch/Forever Florida. Most people seemed to think it meant dressing up and playing cowboy for the weekend. The term, as used by cowboys, especially at rodeos, has a totally different meaning.

 

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The Summer 2013 Edition American Roads Magazine

 

 

American Roads is proud to present the 2013 Summer Edition of American Roads Magazine.

  

Adirondack Trail Mix  

The Great Camp Experience
Part I, Santanoni

By Persis Granger

For centuries the Adirondacks have held allure for those with time and money to travel. Even in the late 1800s and early 1900s, those from more populated areas flocked to the mountains for beautiful scenery, fresh air and outdoor recreation. Many sought out hotels and boarding houses in our Adirondack villages and towns. Others, more affluent, built their own private retreats. The grandest of these homes came to be known as the “Great Camps.” Wealthy families used to summering in “cottages” in Saratoga Springs, Newport or Mount Desert Island sought a different experience, a place where gentility bumped up against wilderness. The Adirondack region was that place, and architects carved out of the vast forest tracts magnificent vacation estates, each with multiple buildings, to be staffed with dozens of local residents, some of whom resided in the camp’s service quarters. The list of camps includes places like Pine Knot, White Pine, Top Ridge, Uncas and Sagamore. Steven Englehart, Executive Director of Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH), estimates that as many as sixty great camps were built during this period. One of the earliest—and arguably one of the grandest of its time—was Camp Santanoni, designed for Albany banker Robert C. Pruyn and built mostly in 1892-93 on 12,500 acres in the town of Newcomb.

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Agri Lanes

Fifty Cents and a Dream

by Kathleen Walls

The Duke Homestead story begins with a man who had fifty cents, a war devastated farm, a dream and not much else. When a young farmer, Washington Duke, built his home in 1852 on his small farm, he never dreamed it would be a National Historic Landmark one day. But this two-story frame house was to become the birthplace of one of the largest industries in the United States.

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Americans on the Road

Holiday in Switzerland

by Ren�e S. Gordon

It has been stated that Switzerland is an island surrounded by land and to some extent that is true. The 15,940 sq. mile country, 216-miles wide and 137-miles in length, is situated in the shadow of the Alps in the midst of Austria, France, Germany, Italy and Liechtenstein and yet stands out as a totally unique destination. Most noted for its scenic beauty and extensive, year round, outdoor activities, Switzerland has many more one-of-a-kind offerings that will take your breath away. >

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Art Trails

The Maine Art Affair

by Anne Jenkins

I followed a grand tradition of artists by heading North to Maine this spring. Not that I'm anywhere near this category, but over the years the likes of Georgia O'Keefe, Edward Hopper, Maurice Prendergast, Max Weber, George Bellows and ofcourse members of the Wyeth family spent summers working individually or in groups around the gentle state. That's a pretty good recommendation in my book.

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Chuckwagon Roundup

Georgia Plays Musical Restaurants

by Kathleen Walls

There are lots of restaurants with musical ties but Georgia seems to have more than her share. Here are a few of my all time Peach State favorites.

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Civil War Trails

The Chickamauga Campaign

by Kathleen Walls

On September 19 -20, 1863, Union Army of the Cumberland  under Major General William Rosecrans suffered a major defeat to the Confederate army of Tennessee under General Braxton Bragg at the Battle of Chickamauga. The battle marked the end of a Union offensive in southeastern Tennessee and northwestern Georgia called the Chickamauga Campaign

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Cort's Crossroads

Relaxing like Royalty at the King and Prince


by Leigh Cort

How do you capture a cosmic blazing sunrise, a dusky purple sunset, a playful dolphin peeking out of the ocean for a brief moment? Where can a solo traveler find a place of solitude for a few days that might change or enhance a memorable getaway?  Perhaps it was time to stop dreaming about life and start living the dream. One of the advantages of traveling alone is allowing for more discovery of yourself without reserve

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Exploring With Eleanor

Tex-Mex Begins in San Antonio

By Eleanor Hendricks McDaniel

Our brightly colored vessel moves peacefully under a canopy of trees and arched bridges that stretch over a river as thin as a stream. Outdoor cafes teeter close to the water. Mouthwatering odors of grilling beef assail us as we pass restaurants. Hordes of happy folks meander, shop, eat and mill around. Music blares from the trumpets of Mariachi bands.

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Fork in The Road

Waterside at Cuscowilla

By Kathleen Walls

Nestled on the banks of Lake Oconee in Putnam County, Georgia, Cuscowilla Golf Resort offers so much more than golf. There is lodging, water fun and that oh-so-important item; great food. Their Waterside Restaurant offers a fine variety of delectable edibles.

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Happy Trails

Aldo Leopold's Family Shack and Farm

By Tom Straka
Photographs by Pat Straka

This travel destination is little more than a shack.  Not even a nice shack.  It was remodeled out of an abandoned chicken coup!  In 1935, when the Dust Bowl drought was still teaching homesteaders the dangers of cultivating marginal croplands, Aldo Leopold, a forester and wildlife professor from the University of Wisconsin, bought a worn out farm along the Wisconsin River for a weekend family retreat.  This farm served as the main inspiration for the conservation/environmental classic Sand County Almanac.

 

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Inn Roads

Claremont House: A Victorian Beauty

By Kathleen Walls

People are talking about a certain Victorian beauty in Rome Georgia. She may be up in years a bit but she is certainly not over the hill. This charming Victorian Lady is coddled and pampered by the McHaggee family, Chris, Holly Iris, their three cats, Loki, Desil and Trey, and a few chickens. Irish has fallen in love with the white chicken.. Actually Chris and Holly do all the coddling and pampering, not to mention the hard work, while three-year old daughter Iris and the three cats  just offer their considerable charm.

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Literary Trails

Flannery O'Conner:
The Waning Yars

By Kathleen Walls

Flannery O'Conner is considered one of the most important American authors of the 20th century and perhaps the most important Southern woman in the field.  Her work is standard fare in many colleges. To understand Flannery O'Conner, the author of “Wise Blood,” “A Good Man is Hard to Find” and other stories, requires a pilgrimage to Georgia. You can visit her birthplace in Savannah. That  is an important point in her life naturally. Located at 207 East Charlton Street. the house museum is a modest,  three-story row house with narrow rooms decorated much as it was during the first thirteen years of Flannery's life.

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Native Trails

The Ultimate Betrayal

By Kathleen Walls

Throughout history, cases of man’s inhumanity to his fellow man abound. The German Holocaust is known and condemned by all. Public outcry is long and loud over newer  instances such as the Bosnian genocide. The United States is not free from guilt. The tragedy of “The Trail of Tears” cries for remembrance throughout the ages. Although not as well publicized as some other instances of genocide, the Cherokee Removal was American history’s ultimate betrayal.

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Off The Beaten Trail

Greensboro- It's for Real

By Kathleen Walls

When Flo, the Waffle House waitress in her fifties hairdo and booming voice, jumped aboard our tour bus just before we headed for Greensboro, Georgia, we all wondered what was going on. It didn't take long to figure it out.  Ellen Hester, in her Flo character, was a motivational speaker here to tell us the story of Greensboro. She made it so simple and that fit Greensboro.

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Pot Luck

Strawberry Shortcake Festivals

By Mary Emma Allen

Strawberry festivals provided memorable events in my childhood. As you travel today, you may find other towns have these taste tantalizing affairs, or those surrounding other foods raised in the local area.

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Ren�e's Route

Florida's Real Fountian of Youth

by Ren�e S. Gordon

More than 325,000 Native Americans had occupied the area that is now Florida for more than 12,000-years when the first documented European reached its shores 500-years ago and at that time the native population was approximately 35,000. Juan Ponce de Leon had sailed on Columbus’ second voyage and had been intrigued by the “island” and tales he had heard of great wealth and waters with restorative powers. On March 27, 1513 three ships under his command landed, named and claimed the land for Spain and his subsequent search for the “Fountain of Youth” is commemorated in the Fountain of Youth Archeological Park, Florida’s oldest attraction, in St. Augustine, Florida. www.fountainofyouthflorida.com  

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Tibs Trails and Tastes

Antebellum Trail in Georgia

By Christine Tibbets

Little Lucy Cobb connected me to the families of antebellum Georgia. I was in her house, in front of her portrait, figuring out new ways to consider the South in the years before the Civil War

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Vagabond Traveler

Visit Robert Frost's New Hampshire Homes

By Mary Emma Allen

New Hampshire played a significant role in Robert Frost's life and was reflected in his poetry. He spent periods of his life in at least three areas of the Granite State and gleaned materials for much of his poetry in these towns of Derry, Plymouth and Franconia.

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Warren's Bi-Ways

Bok Tower Gardens

by Warren Resen

Central Florida is known for world-class attractions and Bok Tower Gardens is one of them.  Located atop Iron Mountain, it is the highest elevation on the Florida peninsula at 298 feet.   

Nearly 700 acres of conservation lands and gardens occupy these   dizzying heights which surround the world famous 205-ft “Singing Tower” carillon and the 20-room 1930’s Mediterranean-style Pinewood Estate. Two hundred and fifty acres are dedicated solely to the gardens.

 

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Wet Roads

Bayou Bartholomew:
The longest bayou in the world

by Zoie Clift

Originating near Pine Bluff, Bayou Bartholomew is recognized as the lengthiest body of water of its sort in the world. It stretches for hundreds of miles before emptying into the Ouachita River near Sterlington, Louisiana. The stream contributes significantly to the economic development and cultural life of the region, and serves as the primary border separating the Delta from the Timberlands in Arkansas.

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The Spring 2012 Edition American Roads Magazine

Adirondack Trail Mix

Environmental and Geo-Tourists -
A New Breed of Adirondack Visitors
by Persis Granger

The southern Adirondacks' Lake George Region is a well-known tourist destination in New York, and has its share of traditional tourist businesses�amusement parks, T-shirt shops, hotels, bars and restaurants, motorboats, museums and historical sites. But there is a new breed of traveler that seeks more than personal gratification and relaxation. They are interested in understanding the regional ecosystem and the societal and economic challenges threaten them. They participate in a tourism that celebrates and respects the distinctive geological, cultural, historic and aesthetic character and the trad-itions of a region. These vacationers have been alternately dubbed �environmental tourists� and �geo-tourists�. It is these tourists who shun traditional attractions and blacktopped strip malls and turn off the Interstates to meander into the countryside to rub elbows with the authenticity of the region.

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Art Trails

A Weapon of Art - The Torpedo Factory
by Anne Jenkins

Art contributes to the revitalization of an area or town - I might be banging this drum a lot but there can be no doubt about it. If you need living proof it is in Alexandria, Virginia - and the 37+ year old Torpedo Factory, one of the grand old dames of artist�s colonies. She might have gone through a couple of facelifts during those years but she is still a magnetic draw for the crowds.

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Civil War Trails

Top Ten Civil War Places
Kathleen Walls

For Civil War buffs, what better way to learn about America's most devastating tragedy than visiting museums
and battlefields. Here's my pick of the top ten for a great overview of the War Between the States. Each one
highlights a unique fact most people do not know about the War Between the States.

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Dusty Roads

California Kicks on Route 66
By Mike Marino

Route 66, the Mother Road, the Main street of America, an overflow of Okies sailing on the literary waters of
Steinbeck's "river of immigrants". Whatever! According to the Route 66 song, "It winds from Chicago to L.A....more
 than 2,000 miles all the way." Somewhere along the long and winding road of history it took the off-ramp at high
speed, with t...he pop culture pedal to the metal and ended up as an iconic piece of American asphalt folklore
that attracts an international fan base from Norway to Japan! The mating of Route 66 and the automobile gave
birth to an entire spectrum of roadside culture that included meeting the motoring publics need for roadside
diners and cafes, gas stations, neon motels for lodging, drive-in theaters that doubled as teen passion pits, and
drive-in fast food joints loaded with rock and roller skating carhop karma. Historically, it was the setting for
Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath," and subsequently the film of the same name. Both book and film were
considered socialist radicalism at the time, however, the book won the Pulitzer Prize and the film walked away
with the Academy Award! So, three cheers for socialism in the Thirties!

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Fork in The Road

Secrets of Louisville Chefs Live
by Kathleen Walls

It's a secret but I'll share it. Did you know you can be a guest on a wonderful culinary experience, a live taping of "Secrets of Louisville Chefs." You don't have to be in New York or Los Angeles. This is filmed with a live audience at Sullivan University's Kitchen Theater in Louisville, Kentucky.

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Historical Roads

Ferry Plantation House
By Kathleen Walls

"I be not a witch." So said Grace Sherwood. It took three hundred years but finally, the powers that be believed her. On July 10, 2006, Meyera Oerdorf, Mayor of Virginia Beach read the letter from Virginia Governor Timothy M. Kaine officially exonerating Grace Sherwood of the charge of witchcraft imposed on her in the early 1706.

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Inn Roads

Living Up To The Legacy
By Kathleen Walls

The heritage of the Galt House Hotel begins long before the magnificent 25 story hotel on the banks of the Ohio River that is the official hotel of the Kentucky Derby. The original Galt House was literally that, the home of Dr. William Craig Galt who was well known for his hospitality. He was a noted physician in the early days of Louisville and a member of the first Louisville Medical Society. He was the attending physician for Louisville founder, George Rogers Clark, when General Clark's leg was amputated in 1809. Clark was the brother of William Clark, the Clark in the Lewis and Clark expedition.

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Pot Luck

Baby Chicks & Other Spring Things
By Mary Emma Allen

As we travel around the country this time of year, we may spy "spring things" that bring back memories of events and recipes.  When I saw some baby chicks recently, I was transported to the days when my dad picked up a box of these fluffy birds at the post office.   These yellow balls of peeping puff fascinated us children, and we looked forward each spring when Father ordered the chicks to add to the flock.

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Ren�e's Route

An American Pilgrimage,
The Mississippi Delta Blues Trail and the Footsteps of The Help
by Ren�e S. Gordon

There is no region in the country that is more distinctive and descriptive of a significant African American experience that impacted on the history of the entire nation than the Mississippi delta. In myth the area begins in the lobby of Memphis' Peabody Hotel and ends at the levee on Vicksburg's Catfish Row. In reality the Mississippi Delta, not to be confused with the Mississippi River Delta in Louisiana, is an alluvial plain situated between the Mississippi and Yazoo Rivers in the northwestern section of the state of Mississippi. The region encompasses portions or all of seventeen counties.

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Street Party

Lets Talk Derby
Article by Kathleen Walls

The Fall 2013 Edition American Roads Magazine

 

American Roads is proud to present the 2013 Fall Edition of American Roads Magazine.

It's been called "the fastest two minutes in sports" but the festivities surrounding America's premier Thoroughbred race last far longer than that. The race is held the first Saturday in May and is the culmination of a two week long Kentucky Derby Festival. Louisville Kentucky is the home of the world famous track and it pulls out all stops these two weeks. The opening event gets off with a bang. Literally. The Galt House Hotel, official hotel of the Derby, offers Thunder over Louisville, the biggest fireworks display in the nation.

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Table Talk

Delectable Edibles From Savannah Inns
By Leigh Cort

It's not often that I'm inspired to write a sequel to a foodie story but this season I can't ignore the four fabulous innkeepers  who ROCK when the pressure is on. They hosted a gathering at one of the historic inns that required a specific theme for delectable hors d'oeuvres  something that reflects their luscious Inn breakfasts that translate into cocktail party fare. I call it Southern Hospitality!

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Vagabond Traveler

Developing Memorable Collections From Your Travels
By Mary Emma Allen

As you travel, you'll find various items and information of interest for developing collections. Some of these may be educational, others create memories, while others help you work toward a goal. The list is almost endless, depending on your area of interest

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View from the Marina

Welcome Aboard, Newbies
By Barb Hansen

Most of our yacht chartering customers have cruised before. Many own or have owned yachts. When I go over the dos and don'ts, they get it. But I really like explaining it to newbies. If I do it right, I tell myself, they'll enjoy the cruise even more and feel like they'll want to cruise again. They'll get what cruising is all about.

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Western Trails

Civil War Trails: Harpers Ferry
by Tom Straka
Photographs by Pat Straka

There would be many places to start the Civil War trail and Harpers Ferry, West Virginia would have to be one of them. It is at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers and this made it one of the hubs of early American history. The town is a mixture of picturesque public and private buildings and is a National Historical Park that goes all the way back to a ferry operated by Robert Harper and his heirs from the mid-1700's to 1824 when a bridge was built across the Potomac. Surprisingly, much of the historical park deals with the multi-layered history of the town and not just one important incident. But, yes, there is plenty about John Brown also.

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White Water Trails

Reunion Destination: Grand Canyon Rafting
by Wendy Rubicam

Modern families are often spread out across the world, and family reunions are becoming increasingly more important to maintain family ties and to share experiences as a family. In addition to the distance between family members, work and activities schedules can make it difficult to plan time together with extended family. The perfect solution to this dilemma is to plan a �destination reunion� which allows families to combine their vacation and travel plans with other family members for a truly memorable trip.

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